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Fundamentals of Three-Dimensional Art I

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ART 107

       Course Name: Fundamentals of Three-Dimensional Art I

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 6 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

None

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course explores basic media and form leading to expression of personal concept. Topics in media include clay, plaster (additive or subtractive), wood, plaster casting and other construction materials such as metal, paper and epoxy. Topics in form cover relationships of masses, lines and textures to each other. Studio work outside of regular class time required.

IV.   Learning Objectives

A.    Student will indicate a working knowledge of the visual vocabulary of 3 dimensional design via class critiques.

B.    Student will create original works of art that demonstrate an understanding of composing with real shapes and forms in real space.

C.    Student will integrate shape and form along with physical materials (medium) of: clay, paper, foamcore, wood etc.

D.    Student will employ examples of additive, as well as subtractive, approaches to solving spatial problems.

E.    Student will objectively critique his/her own and others’ art work.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    Technical construction using assemblage, modeling, molding, casting and carving with clay, plaster or wood, paper, wire and tape etc.

B.    Knowledge and understanding of the various effects of mass, relative scale, proportion, volume, texture, color, line, negative space, as well as symmetrical and asymmetrical balance as it relates in a sculptural context.

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Demonstration, lecture, slides, discussion review both in groups and on an individual class by class basis.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

A.    Participation in group discussion, critiques and/or field trips.

B.    Complete assignments on time.

C.    Use and articulate technical art vocabulary.

D.    Use the materials and tools with respect for safety and respect for the studio.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

The student will approach 3-D design from two viewpoints of equal importance.  One is theoretical, developing an understanding of objects in space by doing small assignments that begin with linear space and proceed to planar and volumetric space.

The other viewpoint is based on our perceived reality and will develop the student’s understanding of it by focusing on abstract relationships of proportion, texture, movement, negative and positive space, shape, form, color

Media provided include:  wire, cardboard/foam core, clay, plaster and wood.  Hand tools, power hand tools and free standing power tools.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

A.    Each project is followed by a formal discussion (critique) session.  Work is graded on student’s solution to the spatial problem based on concept, image and technique.

B.    Attendance is mandated by instructor.

C.    Participation in group critiques.

D.    Use of art related vocabulary.

XI.   Other Course Information



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.