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Visual Basic .NET Programming for Files and Databases

I.     Course Prefix/Number: CIS 210

       Course Name: Visual Basic .NET Programming for Files and Databases

       Credits: 4 (3 lecture; 2 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

Recommended: CIS 180 and CAB 140, or consent of instructor, department coordinator or chair.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course concentrates on writing programs that use files and databases to enter, store, and display data. Content includes various data controls, grids, and data bound controls used with the access technologies provided by Visual Basic; principles of database usage, use of Structured Query Language (SQL) to provide access to data, Data Access Objects, Remote Data Objects, ODBC, and Active X Data Objects.

IV.   Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write, test, and document a variety of Visual BASIC programs which include:

  1. Creation and maintenance of sequential, random, and binary files
  2. Creating and maintenance of database files
  3. Reports generated from files and databases
  4. Various data controls, grids, and data bound controls
  5. Structured Query Language (SQL) access to databases

The student will be familiar with and write programs involving one or more of the following:

  1. Data Access Objects
  2. Remote Data Objects
  3. ODBC
  4. Active X Data Objects
  5. Multi-user database design

The student will display competency in program design and problem solving including:
 
  1. Program design through appropriate tools such as TOE charts, hierarchy charts, flowcharts, and pseudocode
  2. Creation of user interface
  3. Selection of appropriate controls
  4. Debugging and error handling
  5. Preparation of adequate documentation
  6. Deployment of database applications

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A. Data Files
   1. File organization and concepts
    a. Sequential Data Files
      1) Sequential files as input
      2) Sequential files as output
      3) Updating sequential files
    b. Random Data Files
      1) Defining a record structure for a random file
      2) Random files as input
      3) Random files as output
      4) Updating random files
  2. Database Files
    a. Database concepts and overview
    b. Designing a database
    c. Creating a database
      1) Tables
      2) Indexes
      3) Relations
      4) Queries
    d. Modifying the database structure
      1) Adding and deleting tables
      2) Adding, deleting, and editing indexes
      3) Adding, deleting and editing fields
      4) Deleting a relation
      5) Using SQL to modify the database
    e. Constructing a database with other tools
      1) Visual Data Manager
      2) Microsoft Access
    f. Data-Aware Controls
      1) Traditional controls (Textbox, Checkbox, OptionButton, PictureBox, Label, Image, OLE)
      2) Advanced controls (DataCombo, DataList, DataGrid, and HflexGrid)
      3) Data Repeater
      4) Other useful controls (Date Picker, Calendar, RichTextBox)
    g. Data-Bound Controls
      1) An introduction to data binding
      2) Data Bound Grid Control
      3) MSHFlex Grid Control
    h. ActiveX Control
      1) Creating an ActiveX control
      2) Exposing properties within the control
      3) Binding the control to the Data Repeater
    i. Active X Data Objects (ADO)
      1) Structure of ADO
      2) Connection, Command, and Recordset objects
      3) Adding, modifying, and deleting records
      4) Other ADO Objects (Error Object, Parameter Object, Field Object, Property Object)
    j. Introduction to SQL
    k. Recordsets
      1) Searching for specific records (Dynasets and Snapshots)
      2) NoMatch Property
      3) Bookmarks
      4) Seeking with table indexes (Table Recordsets)
    l. Reordering a Table Recordset
    m. Multi-table relations
    n. Creating a user interface
    o. Report creation
    p. Graphing Data using the Graph Control
    q. Displaying Data in Grids
    r. Validation and Error Trapping
    s. MultiUser database design
      1) Sharing with a File Server
      2) Database locking
    t. Database application deployment
      1) Optimizing database applications
      2) Using multi-field indexes
      3) End-user tuning
      4) Application Setup Wizard
      5) Connection issues
      6) Sharing the database
    u. Legacy software—Data Object Models
      1) DAO (Data access objects)
      2) RDO (Remote data objects)

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Reading, lecture, discussion, group work, demonstration of programs, hands-on exercises and projects,
assignments, quizzes, and/or tests
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Reading: Students will be expected to read text book and research appropriate manuals as needed.
Writing: Interactive programming requires student to be able to write screen and other instructions using clear and syntactically correct English..
Computer: Students will use computers to create, test and debug a variety of programs.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Students will be evaluated on quality of programs, other written and/or oral assignments, quizzes, and tests as specified by the instructor.

XI.   Other Course Information



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.