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Observation and Assessment of the Young Child

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 107

       Course Name: Observation and Assessment of the Young Child

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 1 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

None

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course explores developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive observation and assessment strategies for studying the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children birth through eight years. Students will develop skills in using systematic observation and documentation strategies to develop trusting relationships with children and to plan appropriate programs, environments, and activities in early childhood settings. Field observations required.

IV.   Learning Objectives

The student will:

1.    describe the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of children
        birth through eight years

2.      identify and utilize a variety of observation and assessment strategies for
        studying the development of young children

3.    assess children’s physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development by using a variety of observation and assessment strategies

4.    interpret and utilize information gathered through observation and assessment to support the overall development of young children

5.    describe the strengths and limitations of different observation and assessment strategies

6.    describe the relationship between authentic observation and assessment and planning and programming in early childhood settings

7.    follow guidelines for ethical practice when collecting and utilizing assessment data in early childhood settings.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.

IPTS

STANDARD 1 – Content Knowledge
The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
1A.  understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to
the discipline(s) in which certification is sought.

STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. 

Knowledge Indicators – The competent teacher:
2B.  understands that students’ physical, social, emotional, ethical, and cognitive development influences learning.

STANDARD 8 – Assessment
The competent teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
8A.  understands assessment as a means of evaluating how students learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting the Illinois Learning Standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development.
8B  understands the purposes, characteristics, and limitations of different kinds of assessments.
8C.  understands measurement theory and assessment-related issues, such as validity, reliability,
bias and scoring.
8D.  understands how to use the results of assessment to reflect on and modify teaching.

 
ECCS

STANDARD 6 – Curriculum
The competent early childhood teacher understands the comprehensive nature of the physical, emotional, and social well-being of children from birth through grade three; understands the role of human development and physical activity as elements central to active, healthy life styles; and promotes the abilities of children from birth through grade three as they develop and practice skills that contribute to good health and enhance quality of life.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
6A.  understands ways in which physical, social, and emotional well-being of children enhances enjoyment, challenges, self-expression, and social interaction.

STANDARD 8 – Human Development and Learning
The competent early childhood teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
8A.  understands how children fro birth through grade three develop physically, socially, emotionally, cognitively, linguistically and aesthetically.
8C.  understands how brain development from birth through grade three is promoted through developmentally and culturally appropriate learning experiences.

STANDARD 9 – Diversity
The competent early childhood teacher understands how children and families differ in their perspectives and approaches to learning and creates opportunities for growth and learning that are developmentally and culturally appropriate and are adapted for children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
9B.  understands cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of familial, socio-cultural, and political contexts for development and learning.
9C.  recognizes that children are best understood within the context of family, culture, and society.

STANDARD 13 – Communication
The competent early childhood teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
13B.  understands how cultural, gender, and socioeconomic differences can affect communication in the classroom.
13D.  understands the interrelationships among culture, language, and thought and the function of the home language in the development of young children.

STANDARD 14 – Assessment
The competent early childhood teacher understand various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all children.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
14B.  understands the purposes, characteristics and limitations of different kinds of assessments.
14D.  understands how to use the results of assessment to reflect on and modify teaching.
14E.  understands how to select, construct and use assessment and evaluation strategies and instruments for diagnosis and prescription.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

1.    Observation and its Role in the ECE Classroom
2.    Guidelines for Effective Observation
3.    Defining Assessment
4.    Methods of Assessment
5.    Collecting and Summarizing Information
6.    Interpreting Assessment Information
7.    Using Assessment Information
8.    The Role of Standardized Tests in the ECE Classroom
9.    Legal, Ethical, and Professional Responsibilities in Assessment

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Active class discussion, some lecture, small-group exercises, reading assignments, videos, written assignments, student presentations, exams.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Attendance:  except in unusual circumstances, students must notify the instructor prior to absence.

Make-Up Exams:  a student who is absent may take a make-up exam, if she or he calls the instructor prior to the test, and then re-schedules the exam in the Testing Center.  The instructor may administer a different test for the make-up exam.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Students will be evaluated through written assignments, tests, and attendance and participation.

XI.   Other Course Information

A.    The instructor will provide each class with further information as to attendance, policies, and support systems.
B.    Plagiarism/cheating policies are covered under the Academic Dishonesty section of the current catalog.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.