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Play and Creative Expression for the Young Child

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 125

       Course Name: Play and Creative Expression Expression for the Young Child

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

None

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course provides an overview of play as it relates to the development of the young child. Students explore wide variety of methods for developing self expression and creativity in art, music, movement and drama.

IV.   Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the course, students who satisfactorily complete all work will be able to:
A.    Identify and define the basic theories, stages and functions of play.
B.    Identify the young child's developmental stages in art, music, movement, and drama.
C.    Present and evaluate developmentally appropriate, bias-free activities.
D.    Identify teaching techniques to maximize creative expression.
E.    Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of developmentally appropriate instructional materials to support creativity and play.
F.    Create and maintain an environment which is conducive to creative activities.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.

IPTS
STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
2B.  understands that students’ physical, social, emotional, ethical, and cognitive development influences learning.
 
STANDARD 3 – Diversity
The competent teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
3F.  understands personal cultural perspectives and biases and their effects on one’s teaching.

STANDARD 4 – Planning for instruction
The competent teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, the community, and curriculum goals.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
4A.  understands the Illinois Learning Standards, curriculum development, content, learning theory, and student development and knows how to incorporate this knowledge in planning instruction.
4B.  understands how to develop short-and long-range plans consistent with curriculum goals, learner diversity, and learning theory.
4C.  understands how to take the contextual considerations of instructional materials, individual student interests, and career needs into account in planning instruction that creates an effective  bridge between students’ experiences and career and educational goals.

STANDARD 5 – Learning Environment
The competent teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
5A.  understands principles of and strategies for effective classroom management.
5H.  knows environmental arrangements that promote positive behavior and learning for students with diverse learning characteristics.

STAMDARD 6 – Instructional Delivery
The competent teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
6A.  understands the cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning and how these processes can be stimulated.
6B.  understands principles and techniques, along with advantages and limitations, associated with various

 
ECCS

STANDARD 7 – Curriculum: Fine Arts
The competent early childhood teacher understands the content, function, and achievements of dance, music, drama, and visual arts as primary media for communication, inquiry, and insight and promotes t he abilities of children from birth through grade three as they express t hemselves through the arts.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
7A.  understands the concepts, techniques, and materials of the visual arts, the cultural dimensions of the visual arts and the interrelationships between the visual arts and other art forms.
7B.  understands t he concepts, techniques, and materials for producing, listening to, and responding to music, the cultural dimensions of music, and the interrelationships between music and other art forms.
7C.  understands concepts, techniques, and materials related to drama and dance, the cultural dimension of drama and dance, and interrelationships between drama and dance and other art forms.
7F.  understands the elements of visual art, music, dance, and drama.

STANDARD 8 – Human Development and Learning
The competent early childhood teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
8A.  understands how children from birth through grade three develop physically, socially, emotionally, cognitively, linguistically, and aesthetically.
8B.  understands how to provide learning opportunities, which support and enhance each area of development-physical, social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, and aesthetic.

STANDARD 10 – Planning for Instruction
The competent early childhood teacher understands instructional planning and designs learning opportunities based on knowledge of the children, their families, and t heir communities, and of content areas and curriculum goals.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
10A.  understands how to plan developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum.
10B.  understands the rationale for developmentally and culturally appropriate practice.
10C.  understands how to develop short and long-range instructional plans, which are based on play, open-ended inquiry, and long-term investigation.

 
STANDARD 11 – Learning  Environment
The competent early childhood teacher uses an understanding of individuals and group motivation and behavior as well as of children’s developmental levels and needs to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
11C.  understands how to design learning environments that support the educational needs and interests of all children from birth through grade three.
11D.  understands how to design and maintain physically and psychologically safe, healthy, and productive learning environments.
11E.  understands the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children from birth  through grade three

STANDARD 12 – Instructional Delivery
The competent early childhood teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
12A.  understands the rationale for a variety of instructional strategies, including play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, and inquiry experiences
12B.  understands how to enhance the intellectual curiosity, problem solving, and decision making of children from birth through grade three.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    Play, creativity, and aesthetics
B.    Psychosocial needs - children and adults
C.    Art and creative expression
D.    Observation Techniques
E.    Music and learning
F.    The role of play and development
G.    Planning, developing, materials, executing and evaluating creative activities for young children in a supervised setting
H.    Creative movement
I.    Dramatic play
J.    Play throughout the life span
K.    Outdoor play
L.    Play as curriculum
M.    Lesson plans and activities
N.    Learning centers

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Class will be conducted on a lecture, discussion, active participation basis.  Students will be required to create, present and evaluate activities for children in an approved, supervised setting.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Students are required to attend class, actively participate, complete all assignments including the preparation and presentation of an activity in an approved setting.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Attendance, participation, written and oral assignments, class presentations and examinations.

XI.   Other Course Information

The instructor will provide each class with further information as to attendance, policies and support systems.

Plagiarism/cheating policies are covered under the Academic Dishonesty section of the current catalog.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.