Primary Navigation
  • About
  • Academics
  • Continuing Education
  • Admission
  • Student Life
  • Student Services
  • Library
  • News and Events
  • Giving
Curriculum Design for Early Childhood Programs

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 255

       Course Name: Curriculum Design for Early Childhood Programs

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

ECE 102, ECE 104, ECE 106, ECE 125, all with a minimum grade of C, or consent of department chair.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course focuses on relationship among developmental theory, philosophy, and practice.  Content includes analysis of wide range of early childhood curriculum models.  Emphasis on teacher’s role in planning and creating appropriate learning environments of young children.  Students will write a personal philosophy of education.

IV.   Learning Objectives

A.    Understand the role of developmentally appropriate, anti-bias programming for individuals and groups of young children, based on developmental needs and interests.

B.    Demonstrate the relationship among principles of child development, developmentally appropriate curriculum, and a philosophy of education.

C.    Develop appropriate short and long-term goals.

D.    Plan a developmentally appropriate, anti-bias project for young children that provides for emerging curriculum based on children’s developmental needs and interests.

E.    Investigate individual differences and learning styles in children and adults.

F.    Demonstrate an understanding of the teacher’s role and responsibilities in implementing developmentally appropriate curriculum.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.
 
IPTS
STANDARD 1 – Content Knowledge
The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences t hat make the content meaningful to all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
1A.  understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to the discipline(s) in which certification is sought.
1B.  understands the process of inquiry central to the discipline.
1C.  understands how students’ conceptual frameworks and their misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence their learning.
1D.  understands the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas and to life and career applications.

STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal developments of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
2A.  understands how students construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop habits of mind.
2B.  understands that students’ physical, social, emotional, ethical, and cognitive development influences learning.
2C.  understands human development, learning theory, neural science, and the ranges of individual variation within each domain.
2D.  understands that differences in approaches to learning and performance interact with development.
2E.  understands how to include student development factors when making instructional decisions.

STANDARD 3 – Diversity
The competent teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
3C.  understands how students’ learning is influenced by individual experiences, talents, and prior learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values.
3D.  understands and identifies differences in approaches to learning and performance, including different learning styles, multiple intelligences, and performance modes.
3E.  understands cultural and community diversity through a well-grounded framework and understands how to learn about and incorporate students’ experiences, cultures, and community resources into instruction.
 
STANDARD 4 – Planning for instruction
The competent teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, the community, and curriculum goals.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
4A.  understands the Illinois Learning Standards, curriculum development, content, learning theory, and student development and knows how to incorporate this knowledge in planning instruction.
4B.  understands how to develop short-and long-range plans consistent with curriculum goals, learner diversity, and learning theory.
4C.  understands how to take the contextual considerations of instructional materials, individual student interests, and career needs into account in planning instruction that creates an effective  bridge between students’ experiences and career and educational goals.
4D.  understands when and how to adjust plans based on students’ responses and other contingencies.

STANDARD 5 – Learning Environment
The competent teacher uses a understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
5C.  understands how to help students work cooperatively and productively in groups.
5D.  understands factors that influence motivation and engagement and how to help students become self-motivated.
5E.  knows procedures for inventorying the instructional environment to determine when and how best to meet a student’s individual needs.
5H.  knows environmental arrangements t hat promote positive behavior and learning for students with diverse learning characteristics.

STANDARD 6 – Instructional Delivery
The competent teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
6A.  understands the cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning and how these processes can be stimulated.
6B.  understands principles and techniques, along with advantages and limitations, associated with various instructional strategies.
6C.  knows how to enhance learning through the use of a wide variety of materials as well as human and technological resources.
6D.  understands the disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to learning and how they relate to life and career experiences.
 
STANDARD 7 – Communication
The competent teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, non-verbal, and visual communication techniques to foster activity inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
7B.  understands how cultural and gender differences can affect communication in the classroom
7C.  understands the social, intellectual, and political implications of language use and how they influence meaning.
7D.  understands the importance of audience and purpose when selecting ways to communicate ideas.

STANDARD 8 – Assessment
The competent teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
8A.  understands assessment as a means of evaluating how students learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting the Illinois Learning Standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development.
8B.  understands the purposes, characteristics, and limitations of different kinds of assessments.

STANDARD 9 – Collaborative relationship
The competent teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
9A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
9C.  understands school and work-based learning environments and the need for collaboration with business organizations in the community.
9D.  understands the collaborative process.
9E.  understands collaborative skills which are necessary to carry out the collaborative process.

STANDARD 10 – Reflection and Professional Growth
The competent teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeking opportunities to grow professionally.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
10A.  understands that reflection is an integral part of professional growth and improvement of instruction.
10B.  understands methods of inquiry that provide for a variety of self-assessment and problem-solving strategies for reflecting on practice.

 
STANDARD 11 – Professional Conduce and Leadership
The competent teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct and provides leadership to improve students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
11A.  understands the unique characteristics of education as a profession.

ECCS

STANDARD 1 – Curriculum
The competent early childhood teacher understands and demonstrates the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the content areas and creates and integrates meaningful learning experiences that develop children’s competence across all developmental areas and content areas.

Knowledge indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
1A.  Demonstrates current knowledge of integrated learning experiences for children from birth through grade three and understands the central concepts and tools of inquiry in each of the following content areas:  Language and Literacy (English Language Arts); Mathematics; Science; Health, Safety, Nutrition, and Movement (Physical Development and Health); Art, Music, Drama (Fine Arts); and Social Science.
1B.  Understands conceptually sound and meaningful curriculum for children from birth through grade three.
1C.  Demonstrates an understanding of current research, best practice and professional standards

STANDARD 8 – Human Development
The competent early childhood teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicator:  The competent early childhood teacher
8A.  understands how children from birth through grade three develop physically, socially, emotionally, cognitively, linguistically, and aesthetically.
8B.  understands how to provide learning opportunities, which support and enhance each area of development-physical, social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, and aesthetic.
8C.  understands how brain development from birth through grade three is promoted through developmentally and culturally appropriate learning experiences.
8D.  understands how children from birth through grade three differ in their development and in their approaches to learning.
8E.  understands how to support the development and learning of individual children from birth through grade three.

STANDARD 9 – Diversity
The competent early childhood teacher understands how children and families differ in their perspectives and approaches to learn and creates opportunities for growth and learning that are developmentally and culturally appropriate and are adapted for children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
9A.  understands conditions that affect children’s development and learning, including risk factors, developmental variations, and developmental patterns of specific disabilities.
9B.  understands cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of familial, sociocultural, and political contexts for development and learning,
9C.  recognizes that children are best understood within the contexts of family, culture, and society.
9D.  understands the function of the home language in the development of young children and the interrelationships among culture, language, and thought.

Performance Indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
9E.  creates and modifies environment and experiences which meet the individual needs of all children from birth through grade three and their families, including children with disabilities, developmental delays, and special abilities.
9F.  respects and affirms culturally and linguistically diverse children from birth through grade three and their families.
9H.  demonstrates sensitivity to differences in family structures and social and cultural backgrounds.

STANDARD 10 – Planning for Instruction
The competent early childhood teacher understands instructional planning and designs learning opportunities based on knowledge of the children, their families, and their communities, and of content areas and curriculum goals.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
10A.  understands how to plan developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum.
10B.  understands the rationale for developmentally and culturally appropriate practice.
10C.  understands how to develop short and long-range instructional plans, which are based on play, open-ended inquiry, and long-term investigation.
 
STANDARD 11 – Learning Environment
The competent early childhood teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior as well as of children’s developmental levels and needs to create a learning environment  that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
11A.  understands how to create, select, and evaluate developmentally appropriate materials, equipment and technology for inclusion in the learning environment.
11B.  understands how to adapt strategies to meet the specific needs of all children from birth to grade three, including those with disabilities, developmental delays, or special abilities.
11C.  understands how to design learning environments that support the educational needs and interests of all children from birth through grade three.
11D.  understands how to design and maintain physically and psychologically safe, healthy, and productive learning environments.
11E.  understands the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children from birth through grade three.

STANDARD 12 – Instructional Delivery
The competent early childhood teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
12A.  understands the rationale for a variety of instructional strategies, including play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning and inquiry experiences for children from birth through grade three.
12B.  understands how to enhance the intellectual curiosity, problem solving, and decision making children from birth through grade three.

STANDARD 13 – Communication
The competent early childhood teacher uses knowledge of effective, written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
13A.  understands communication theory, language development and the role of language in learning.
13B.  understands how cultural, gender, and socioeconomic differences can affect communication in the classroom.
13C.  understands the interrelationships among language and thought and the function of the home language in the development of young children.

STANDARD 14 – Assessment
The competent early childhood teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all children.

Knowledge indicator:  The competent early childhood teacher
14A.  understands assessment as a means of evaluating how children learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting national, state, and local standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development.
14B.  understands the purposes, characteristics and limitation of different kinds of assessments.

STANDARD 15 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent early childhood teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community service agencies, to support children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicator:  The competent early childhood teacher
15A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community contest.
15B.  understands the benefits, barriers and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.

STANDARD 16 – Reflection and Professional Growth
The competent early childhood teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
16A.  understands that reflection is an integral part of professional growth and improvement of instruction.

STANDARD 17 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent early childhood teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
17A.  understands the unique characteristics of education as a profession and a professional code of conduct [as defined by the Illinois School Code.]
17B.  understands how school systems are organized and operated
17C.  understands school policies and procedures.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    Development of Educational Philosophy
        1.    Historical Theories and Contemporary Issues that Influence Ideas in Early Education
        2.    Tenets of Philosophy

B.    Qualities of the Early Education Teacher
        1.    Adults in the School Setting
        2.    Role of the Teacher
        3.    Structure of Responsibility
        4.    Professional Training   
        5.    Basic Teaching Skills

C.    Development of Age Appropriate Programs for the Pre-School Child
        1.    Conditions that Facilitate Learning
        2.    Process of Learning
            a.    Goals
            b.    Objectives
            c.    Plans
        3.    Play as a Mode for Learning
        4.    Impact of National and Local Agency Standards
            a.    N.A.E.Y.C. Standards
            b.    State of Illinois Licensing Standards
        5.    Parental Expectations

D.    The Challenge of Evaluation
        1.    Basic Principles of Evaluation
        2.    Ways of Observing Children
        3.    Individualization
        4.    Assessment Tools

E.    Classroom Management
        1.    Discipline
        2.    Setting the Limits
            a.    Self-Control
            b.    Acceptable Behavior
        3.    Feelings-Emotions
        4.    Decisions-Responsibility

F.    Home-School Relations
        1.    Goals in Working with Parents
        2.    Parent Involvement

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Instructional methods will include study guides, viewing and discussing appropriate films to aid the students’ understanding of specific topics.  Handouts stemming from current research will supplement class lectures and discussion.  An additional reading list of current books and articles relating to course study will be provided.  Guest speakers will be considered when available and practical.  Lecture and group discussion will emphasize course goals and objectives.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Attendance and active class participation is required.  Students will be responsible for any and all required reading of handouts and viewing films.

Written assignment must be typed or printed in ink.  College level work is required and correct spelling, grammar, neatness is expected.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Students will be evaluated using a point system.  Students’ performance on course assignments, exams, and written observations will all be taken in account in grading.

XI.   Other Course Information

The instructor will provide each class with additional information as to attendance, policies, and support systems.

Plagiarism/Cheating policies are covered under the Academic Dishonesty Section of the current catalog.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.