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Child, Family and Community Relations

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 270

       Course Name: Child, Family and Community Relations

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

ECE 102, ECE 104, and ECE 106, all with minimum grades of C, or consent of department chair.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course focuses on teacher’s role in working with child, family and community, in an early childhood setting.  Emphasis on contemporary family life, communication, diversity, professionalism, national public policy, legal responsibilities, and family involvement.

IV.   Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the course, students satisfactorily complete all work will:

A.    Understand the inter-relatedness of the child’s home, the setting, and the community.

B.    Recognize changing dynamics of family life.  Be knowledgeable about different cultural, religious, and socio-economic family systems.

C.    Establish and maintain mutually respectful, cooperative relationship with families.  Conduct effective family conferences.

D.    Understand the role of ethics in the Early Childhood profession

E.    Become acquainted with community agencies, community resources, and family education programs.

F.    Understand the role of the Early Childhood professional as an advocate for young children and a partner to parents and families in supporting their needs.

G.    Understand the impact of national public policy on young children, their families, and the community.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.

IPTS
STANDARD 1 – Content Knowledge
The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences t hat make the content meaningful to all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
1C.  understands how students’ conceptual frameworks and their misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence their learning.
1D.  understands the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas and to life and career applications.

STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal developments of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
2A.  understands how students construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop habits of mind.
2D.  understands that differences in approaches to learning and performance interact with development.
2E.  understands how to include student development factors when making instructional decisions.

STANDARD 3 – Diversity
The competent teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
3C.  understands how students’ learning is influenced by individual experiences, talents, and prior learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values.
3D.  understands and identifies differences in approaches to learning and performance, including different learning styles, multiple intelligences, and performance modes.
3E.  understands cultural and community diversity through a well-grounded framework and understands how to learn about and incorporate students’ experiences, cultures, and community resources into instruction.
3F.  understands personal cultural perspectives and biases and their effects on one’s teaching.

STANDARD 7 – Communication
The competent teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, non-verbal, and visual communication techniques to foster activity inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
7B.  understands how cultural and gender differences can affect communication in the classroom
7C.  understands the social, intellectual, and political implications of language use and how they influence meaning.
7D.  understands the importance of audience and purpose when selecting ways to communicate ideas.
 
STANDARD 9 – Collaborative relationship
The competent teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
9A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
9B.  understands the benefits, barriers, and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.
9C.  understands school and work-based learning environments and the need for collaboration with business organizations in the community.
9D.  understands the collaborative process.
9E.  understands collaborative skills which are necessary to carry out the collaborative process.

STANDARD 11 – Professional Conduce and Leadership
The competent teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct and provides leadership to improve students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
11C.  understands school policies and procedures.
11E.  understands the importance of active participation and leadership in professional organizations.

ECCS
STANDARD 8 – Human Development
The competent early childhood teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicator:  The competent early childhood teacher
8E.  understands how to support the development and learning of individual children from birth through grade three.
8F.  understands the developmental consequences of stress and trauma on children and their families, including attention to protective factors and resilience.
8G.  understands the development of mental health and the importance of supportive relationships.
8H.  understands basic health, nutrition, and safety needs of children from birth through grade three including specific procedures related to health, safety, and nutrition for infants and toddlers.
8I.  understands appropriate procedures for responding to childhood illnesses and communicable diseases.

STANDARD 9 – Diversity
The competent early childhood teacher understands how children and families differ in their perspectives and approaches to learn and creates opportunities for growth and learning that are developmentally and culturally appropriate and are adapted for children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
9A.  understands conditions that affect children’s development and learning, including risk factors, developmental variations, and developmental patterns of specific disabilities.
9B.  understands cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of familial, sociocultural, and political contexts for development and learning,
9C.  recognizes that children are best understood within the contexts of family, culture, and society.
9D.  understands the function of the home language in the development of young children and the interrelationships among culture, language, and thought.

STANDARD 13 – Communication
The competent early childhood teacher uses knowledge of effective, written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
13A.  understands communication theory, language development and the role of language in learning.
13B.  understands how cultural, gender, and socioeconomic differences can affect communication in the classroom.
13C.  understands the interrelationships among language and thought and the function of the home language in the development of young children.
13D.  understands the interrelationships among culture, language and thought and the function of t he home language in the development of young children.

STANDARD 15 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent early childhood teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community service agencies, to support children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
15A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
15B.  understands the benefits, barriers and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.
15C.  understands the collaborative process and skills, which are necessary to carry out the process.
 
STANDARD 17 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent early childhood teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicator – The competent early childhood teacher
17A.  understands the unique characteristics of education as a profession and a professional code of conduct [as defined by the Illinois School Code.]
17D.  understands legal issues in education.
17E.  understands the importance of active participation and leadership in professional education organizations.

Performance indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
17I.  serves as an advocate on behalf of young children and their families, improved quality of programs and services for young children, and enhanced professional status and working conditions for early childhood educators.
17K.  recognizes signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and understands the responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities.
17M.  follows school policy and procedures, respecting the boundaries of professional responsibilities, when working with students, colleagues, and families.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    The Child’s World in Context
B.    Changing Family Trends
C.    Communicating with Parents
D.    Parent Involvement & Parent Education
E.    Families in Crisis:  Current Parenting Concern
F.    Families with Special Needs
G.    Parent Conferences
H.    Developing Programs for Parents & Families
I.    Making a Referral
J.    Dealing with Issues of Abuse
K.    Advocacy & Outreach to the Community

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Field Trips:
A.    Where to go
B.    Preparing the class
C.    Transportation
D.    Follow-up

Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Attendance:
Except in unusual circumstances students must notify the instructor prior to an absence.  Students are required to read text and a selection of relevant handouts from professional and popular journals.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Written reports; quizzes; mid-term exam; final exam.

XI.   Other Course Information

A.    The instructor will provide each class with further information as to attendance, policies, and support systems.

B.    Plagiarism/Cheating policies are covered under the Academic Dishonesty section of the current catalog.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.