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Legal Aspects of Early Childhood Administration

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 280

       Course Name: Legal Aspects of Early Childhood Administration

       Credits: 1 (1 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

ECE 273 or consent of department chair.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course stresses knowledge and application of legal responsibilities required by a director of an early childhood program.  Focus is on the various legal structures and licensing standards required by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.

IV.   Learning Objectives

l.    Students will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different legal structures and research required codes and regulations such as building, zoning, fire, occupational, safety, health, sanitation and Americans with Disabilities Act.
2.    Students will obtain knowledge about child custody, child abuse, special education, confidentiality, anti-discrimination, insurance liability, contract, and labor laws pertaining to program management.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.

IPTS

STANDARD 1 – Content Knowledge
The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences t hat make the content meaningful to all students.

    Knowledge Indicators – The competent teacher
1A.  understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to the discipline(s) in which certification is sought.
1B.  understands the process of inquiry central to the discipline.


STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal developments of all students.

Knowledge Indicator – The competent teacher
2F.  knows the impact of cognitive, emotional, physical, and sensory disabilities on learning and communication processes.

STANDARD 3 – Diversity
The competent teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
3A.  understands the areas of exceptionality in learning as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and the State Board’s rules for Special Education (23 111. Adm. Code 226).

STANDARD 7 – Communication
The competent teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, non-verbal, and visual communication techniques to foster activity inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Performance Indicator – The competent teacher
7E.  models accurate, effective communication when conveying ideas and information and when asking questions and responding to students.

STANDARD 8 – Assessment
The competent teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students.

Knowledge Indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
8F.  understands the developmental consequences of stress and trauma on children and their families, including attention to protective factors and resilience.
8G.  understands the development of mental health and the importance of supportive relationships.
8H.  understands basic health, nutrition, and safety needs of children from birth through grade three including specific procedures related to health, safety, and nutrition for infants and toddlers.

STANDARD 9 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge Indicators – The competent teacher
9A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
9F.  understands concerns of parents of individuals with disabilities and knows appropriate strategies to collaborate with parents in addressing these concerns.
9G.  understands roles of individuals with disabilities, parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel in planning individualized education programs for students with disabilities.

STANDARD 10 – Reflection and Professional Growth
The competent teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

Knowledge Indicator – The competent teacher
10A.  understands that reflection is an integral part of professional growth and improvement of instruction.

Performance Indicators – The competent teacher
10F.  collaborates with other professionals as resources for problem-solving, generating new ideas, sharing experiences, and seeking and giving feedback.
10H.  actively seeks and collaboratively shares a variety of instructional resources with colleagues.
10I.  assesses his or her own needs for knowledge and skills related to teaching students with disabilities and seeks assistance and resources.

STANDARD 11 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct and provides leadership to improve students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge Indicators – The competent teacher
11A.  understands the unique characteristics of education as a profession.
11D.  understands legal issues in education.
11F.  is familiar with the rights of students with disabilities.
11G.  knows the roles and responsibilities of teachers, parents, students, and other professionals related to special education.
11H.  knows identification and referral procedures for students with disabilities.

Performance Indicators – The competent teacher
11J.  follows codes of professional conduct and exhibits knowledge and expectations of current legal directives.
11K.  follows school policy and procedures respecting the boundaries of professional responsibilities, when working with students, colleagues, and families.
11R.  complies with local, State, and federal monitoring and evaluation requirements related to students with disabilities.
11S.  complies with local, State, and federal regulations and policies related to students with disabilities.
ECCS

STANDARD 1 – Curriculum
The competent early childhood teacher understands and demonstrates the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the content areas and creates and integrates meaningful learning experiences that develop children’s competence across all developmental areas and content areas.

Knowledge Indicator – The competent early childhood teacher
1A.  demonstrates current knowledge of integrated learning experiences for children from birth through grade three and understands the central concepts and tools of inquiry in each of the following content areas:  Language and Literacy (English Language Arts); Mathematics; Science; Health, Safety, Nutrition, and Movement (Physical Development and Health); Art, Music, Drama (Fine Arts); and Social Science.

STANDARD 9 – Diversity
The competent early childhood teacher understands how children and families differ in their perspectives and approaches to learn and creates opportunities for growth and learning that are developmentally and culturally appropriate and are adapted for children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge Indicators - The competent early childhood teacher
9A.  understands conditions that affect children’s development and learning, including risk factors, developmental variations, and developmental patterns of specific disabilities.
9B.  understands cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of familial, sociocultural, and political contexts for development and learning,
9C.  recognizes that children are best understood within the contexts of family, culture, and society.

Performance Indicator - The competent early childhood teacher
9H.  demonstrates sensitivity to differences in family structures and social and cultural backgrounds.

STANDARD 12 – Instructional Delivery
The competent early childhood teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills

Knowledge Indicator – The competent early childhood teacher
12D.  understands the importance of utilizing knowledge and strategies from multiple disciplines and systems in instructional delivery and in the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) and Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) for children from birth through grade three.

Performance Indicator – The competent early childhood teacher
12H.  makes decisions regarding intervention strategies and daily activities which incorporate knowledge and strategies from multiple disciplines, including health and social service systems, for children from birth through grade three and their families with Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) and Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).

STANDARD 14 – Assessment
The competent early childhood teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses t hem to support the continuous development of all children.

Knowledge Indicator – The competent early childhood teacher
14A.  understands assessment as a means of evaluating how children learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting national, state, and local standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development.

Performance Indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
14K.  communicates assessment results and integrates assessment results from others as an active participant in the development and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) goals for children with special developmental and learning needs.
14L.  involves families in assessing and planning for individual children, including children with disabilities, developmental delays, or special abilities.
14M.  uses appropriate technologies to monitor and assess student progress.

STANDARD 15 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent early childhood teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community service agencies, to support children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge Indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
15A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
15B.  understands the benefits, barriers and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.
15C.  understands the collaborative process and skills, which are necessary to carry out the process.

Performance Indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
15I.  links families with a range of family-oriented services based on identified resources, priorities, and concerns.
15J.  establishes and maintains positive, collaborative relationships with colleagues, other professionals and families, and works effectively as a member of a professional team.
15K.  identifies and uses community resources to enhance children’s development, learning, and well-being and to explore career opportunities.

STANDARD 17 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent early childhood teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve children’s learning and well-being.

Performance Indicators – The competent early childhood teacher
17H.  follows codes of professional conduct and exhibits knowledge of expectations of current legal directives.
17I.  serves as an advocate on behalf of young children and their families, improved quality of programs and services for young children, and enhanced professional status and working conditions for early childhood educators.
17K.  recognizes signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and understands the responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities.
17L.  communicates effectively with other professionals concerned with children and with agencies in the larger community to support children’s development, learning, and well-being.
17M.  follows school policy and procedures, respecting the boundaries of professional responsibilities, when working with students, colleagues, and families.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

Advantages and disadvantages of different legal structures
Code Regulations
Department of Children and Family Services Licensing Standards
Americans with Disabilities Act
Legal issues pertaining to early childhood/school age program services
Insurance liability
Contract and labor laws

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Lecture, guest speakers, class discussions, written tests, individual reports, oral presentations
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

A. Reading of texts and supplemented readings will be required.

B. Student will be required to demonstrate competency by successfully completing written tests, assignments, reports, and oral presentations.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Written tests, oral reports, written assignments

XI.   Other Course Information



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.