Statics and Strength of Materials

I.     Course Prefix/Number: MEC 230

       Course Name: Statics and Strength of Materials

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

None

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course covers concepts of statics and strength of materials. Content includes forces, force components, trusses, centroids, equilibrium, stress and strain, defection of beams, torsion, and various types of joints. Recommended: MAT 110 or MAT 114 or higher-level MAT course.

IV.   Learning Objectives

In the statics part of the course, students will learn:

  1. mathematical representation of forces
  2. effects of forces on various physical entities
  3. relationship between forces and geometry of object necessary for maintaining equilibrium

In the strength of material part, students will learn:

  1. stress and strain relationship
  2. effect of forces on the behavior of material
  3. prescribing material and geometry of physical entities to satisfy the design criteria

V.    Academic Integrity and Student Conduct

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.

Please review the Code of Academic Conduct and the Code of Student Conduct, both located online at
www.oakton.edu/studentlife/student-handbook.pdf

VI.   Sequence of Topics

  1. FORCES
    1.1   Force
    1.2   Effects of a Force
    1.3   Characteristics of a Force
    1.4   Components of a Force
    1.5   Moment of a Force
    1.6   Principle of Moments
  2. EQUILIBRIUM OF BODIES
    2.1   Equilibrium
    2.2   The Free-Body Diagram
    2.3   Solution of Equilibrium Problems by Use of Moment Equations
    2.4   Solution of Equilibrium Problems by Use of Equations for Sums of Components
    2.5   Solution of Equilibrium Problems by Use of Force Polygons
    2.6   Equilibriums of Shafts
    2.7   Truss
    2.8   Two-Force Members
    2.9   Truss Analysis by the Method of Joints
    2.10   Flexible Cable
    2.11   Parabolic Cables
    2.12   Friction
    2.13   Coefficient of Friction
    2.14   Belt Friction
  3. SIMPLE STRESS AND STRAIN
    3.1   Stress
    3.2   Tension and Tensile Stress
    3.3   Compression and Compressive Stress
    3.4   Shear and Shearing Stress
    3.5   Strain in Tension and Compression
    3.6   Strain in Shear
    3.7   Relation between Stress and Strain
    3.8   Proportional limit and Ultimate Strength
    3.9   Working Stress and Factor of Safety
    3.10   How to Determine the Sizes of Members
    3.11   Thermal Deformation and Stress
  4. CENTROID OF AN AREA
    4.1   Centroid
    4.2   Centroids of Simple Areas
    4.3   Moment of a Simple Area
    4.4   Moment of a Composite Area
    4.5  Centroid of a Composite Area
  5. MOMENT OF INERTIA OF AN AREA
    5.1   Moment of Inertia
    5.2   Moments of Inertia of Simple Area
    5.3   Parallel-Axis Theorem
    5.4   Moments of Inertia of Composite Areas
  6. STRESSES IN BEAMS
    6.1   Beam Types
    6.2   Reactions on Beams
    6.3   Shear in Beams
    6.4   Shear Diagrams
    6.5   Bending Moment
    6.6   Moment Diagrams
    6.7   Maximum Bending Moment
    6.8   Bending Stress, the Flexure Formula
    6.9   The Section Modulus
    6.10   Design of Circular Beams
    6.11   Design of Rectangular Beams
    6.12   Beams of Standard Shapes
    6.13   Design of Beams of Standard Shapes
    6.14   Shearing Stress in Beams
    6.15   Shearing Stress in Rectangular Beams
    6.16   Shearing Stress in Circular Beams
    6.17   Shearing Stress in Beams of Standard Shapes
  7. BENDING MOMENT COMBINED WITH TENSION OR COMPRESSION
    7.1   Calculation of the Axial Stress
    7.2   Calculation of the bending Stress
    7.3   Bending Stress Combined with Axial Stress
  8. DEFLECTIONS OF BEAMS
    8.1   Deflections
    8.2   Maximum Deflection of a Beam with a concentrated Load at the Center
    8.3   Maximum Deflection of a Beam with a Uniformly Distributed Load
    8.4   Formulas for Beam Deflection
    8.5   Beam Deflection by Superposition
  9. STATICALLY INDETERMINATE BEAMS
    9.1   Types of Supports and Reactions
    9.2   Fixed Beams
    9.3   Continuous Beams
  10. MEMBERS SUBJECTED TO TORSION
    10.1   Torque
    10.2   Torsional Shearing Stress in a Solid Circular Bar
    10.3   Torsional Shearing Stress in a Hollow Circular Bar
    10.4   How to Choose the Diameter of a Solid Circular Bar
    10.5   Angle of twist of a Circular Bar
    10.6   Torsional Shearing Stress in a Rectangular Bar
    10.7   Torsional Shearing Stress in Thin-Walled Open Sections
    10.8   Torsional Shearing Stress in Thin-Walled Closed Sections/td>
  11. BENDING MOMENT COMBINED WITH TORQUE
    11.1   Torque Diagrams
    11.2   Moment Diagrams for Shafts
    11.3   Maximum Shearing Stress in a Solid Circular Shaft Subjected to Both Bending and Moment and Torque
    11.4   How to Find the Diameter of a Solid Circular Shaft under Bending Moment and Torque
  12. COMPRESSION MEMBERS
    12.1   Radius of Gyration
    12.2   Slenderness Ratio
    12.3   Short Compression Members
    12.4   Intermediate Columns
    12.5   Straight-Line Colum Formulas
    12.6   Parabolic Column Formulas
    12.7   Gordon-Rankine Column Formulas
    12.8   Slender Columns
  13. RIVETED, BOLTED, AND WELDED JOINTS
    13.1   Rivets and Bolts
    13.2   Shearing Stresses in Rivets and Bolts
    13.3   Tensile Stress in Riveted and Bolted Joints
    13.4   Bearing Stress in Rivets and Bolts
    13.5   Standard Sizes of Rivets and Bolts
    13.6   Standard Sizes of bars, Strip, Sheet, and Plate
    13.7   Design of Simple Connections
    13.8   How to Space Rivets and Bolts
    13.9   Welding
    13.10   Arc Welding
    13.11   Gas Welding
    13.12   Butt Welds
    13.13   Fillet Welds
    13.14   Spot Welds
    13.15   Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels
    13.16   Beam Bearing Plates
  14. REPEATED STRESS AND STRESS CONCENTRATION
    14.1   Examples of Repeated Stress
    14.2   Effect of Repetition of Stress on the Strength of a Material
    14.3   Values of Endurance Limit for Completely Reversed Bending Stress
    14.4   Factor of Safety-Working Stress
    14.5   Design of Members Subjected to Repeated Stress

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Lecture demonstration of drawing techniques with a hands on focus emphasizing the solution of drawing problems.


Course may be taught as face-to-face, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Textbook: Statics and Strength of Materials, by C.O. Harris, John Wiley and Sons

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Drawings will be graded according to standard drawing conventions provide on assignment sheets, notes and handouts.  Late submissions will incur a 10% late fee.

A 90%
B 80%
C 70%
D 60%
F Below 60%
Attendance 10%

XI.   Other Course Information



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

Oakton Community College is committed to maintaining a campus environment emphasizing the dignity and worth of all members of the community, and complies with all federal and state Title IX requirements.

Resources and support for
  • pregnancy-related and parenting accommodations; and
  • victims of sexual misconduct
can be found at www.oakton.edu/title9/.

Resources and support for LGBTQ+ students can be found at www.oakton.edu/lgbtq.