Prof. Weaver Homepage


OAKTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ENGLISH 102

Fall 2012

Skokie/Ray Hartstein Campus

Class Meets in Main Building P236

Mondays & Wednesdays ~ Class meets 8:00 am – 9:15 am; Office hours are 9:00 am – 11:00 am

 

Instructor:                   Dr. Sherrill Weaver

Office:                         Skokie/RHC Adjunct Faculty Office

Office Phone:              (847) 635-1645

Office Hours:              M & W 9:30 am – 11:00 am or by appointment.

E-mail:                         weaver@oakton.edu                                                  

Home Page:                 http://www.oakton.edu/~weaver/

 

Welcome to English 102.  I share your commitment to your success!  This syllabus is our semester plan for achieving our shared goal.  How can you achieve success in this course?  Attend all class sessions.  Come to class prepared to discuss assigned readings.  Effectively respond to essay drafts during writing workshops.  Actively participate in individual and group research workshops.  Complete all of your writing assignment drafts, revisions, and final papers on time.  Ask me any questions you have in person, by email, or by phone.

Office Hours: Please feel free to stop by the Adjunct Faculty office on the second floor during office hours to talk about any questions that you have, difficulties that you’re experiencing, or anything else related to your work in this class or being a student at Oakton.

 

I.          Course             Course             Course

            Prefix              Number           Name                           Credit              Lecture            Lab

            EGL                102                  Composition II                3                    3                      0

 

II.        Prerequisite:

            C grade or higher in EGL 101

 

III.       Course (catalog) Description:

            Course introduces strategies for planning, writing, and revising advanced expository essays and the college research paper. Content includes critical reading and analysis, the structure of argument, and the use of sources.

 

IV.       Learning Objectives: 

            The student will be able to:

A.Identify and apply strategies for planning, drafting, and revising advanced expository, argumentative, and research essays for academic audiences.

B.Analyze and evaluate various forms and styles of argument.

C.Accurately and fairly represent the ideas and opinions of others using techniques of summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation.

D.Document source material appropriately using MLA format.

E.Recognize the ways that other academic disciplines document sources. 

F.Use appropriate technology to identify and locate sources for college writing.

G.Analyze, evaluate, compare, and synthesize source materials and use them effectively in assigned essays.

H.Incorporate collaboration with others as part of the revision process. 

 

V.        Academic Integrity:  

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton’s Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

·            cheating,

·            plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),

·            falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),

·            helping others to cheat,

·            unauthorized changes on official documents,

·            pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,

·            making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and

·            any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

 

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy.  Oakton’s policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.

 
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

 
VI.             Sequence of Topics

August 2012

Wk. No.                      Su        Mo       Tu        We       Th        Fr         Sa

Week 1: Course introduction; Diagnostic essay; In-class pre-writing workshop; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

1                                  19        20        21        22        23        24        25

 

 Week 2: Review purpose, process, and academic audiences for cross-curricular topics; Introduce investigative essay; Conferences on topics for investigative essay; Library orientation and research workshop; Assign research log for investigative essay; TRIO presentation 8/22 8:00 am; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

2                                  26        27        28        29        30        31        1

 

 Week 3: Review research strategies for cross-curricular topics; Review strategies for reading research sources; Introduce model format for annotated bibliography; In-class writing; Introduction to MyCompLab; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

September 2012

                                    Su        Mo       Tu        We       Th        Fr         Sa                                           

3                                  2          3          4          5          6          7          8

 

 Week 4: Review research log for investigative essay; Evaluate research results and select sources for investigative essay; Annotated bibliography for investigative essay due; Introduce model format for essay outline; Investigative essay outline due; In-class writing; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

4                                  9          10        11        12        13        14        15

 

 Week 5: Draft of investigative essay due; Editing workshop; In-class writing; Revision of investigative essay; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

5                                  16        17        18        19        20        21        22

 

 Week 6: Investigative essay due; Introduce position argument essay; Conferences on topics for position argument essay; Assign research log for position argument essay; Review research strategies for opposing views topics; Review research log for position argument essay;  In-class writing; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

6                                  23        24        25        26        27        28        29

 

 Week 7: Evaluate research results and select sources for position argument essay; Annotated bibliography for position argument essay due; Position argument essay outline due; In-class writing; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings assigned and discussed

7                                  30

October 2012

                                    Su        Mo       Tu        We       Th        Fr         Sa                                                                                                                   1          2          3          4          5          6

 

 Week 8: Draft of position argument essay due; Editing workshop; In-class writing; Revision of position argument essay; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings on writing an analysis assigned.

8                                  7          8          9          10        11        12        13

 

 Week 9: Position argument essay due; Textbook readings on writing an analysis discussed; Textbook readings on writing essay exams assigned and discussed; In-class analysis essay writing; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings assigned.

9                                  14        15        16        17        18        19        20

 

 Week 10: Introduce proposal to solve a problem essay; Conferences on topics for proposal to solve a problem  essay; Assign research log for proposal to solve a problem essay; Review research strategies for problems and solutions; Review research log for problems and solutions;  In-class writing; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

10                                21        22        23        24        25        26        27

 

 Week 11:  Evaluate research results and select sources for proposal to solve a problem essay; Individual MyCompLab assignments; In-class writing; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

11                                28        29        30        31

November 2012

                                    Su        Mo       Tu        We       Th        Fr         Sa

                                                                                    1          2          3

 

 Week 12: Annotated bibliography proposal to solve a problem essay due; In-class writing; Textbook readings assigned and discussed.

12                                4          5          6          7          8          9          10

 

 Week 13: Proposal to solve a problem essay outline due; Individual MyCompLab assignments; In-class writing; Textbook readings on writing assigned and discussed.

13                                11        12        13        14        15        16        17

 
 

Week 14: Draft of proposal to solve a problem due; Editing workshop; Revision of proposal to solve a problem essay; Individual MyCompLab assignments; In-class writing; Textbook readings on writing assigned and discussed.

14                                18        19        20        21        22        23        24

 
 

Week 15: Proposal to solve a problem essay due; Textbook readings assigned and discussed; Textbook readings on writing an evaluation argument assigned and discussed.

15                                25        26        27        28        29        30       

December 2012

Wk. No.                      Su        Mo       Tu        We       Th        Fr         Sa       

                                                                                                                1

Week 16: Textbook readings on writing an evaluation argument assigned and discussed; In-class evaluation argument essay writing; Individual MyCompLab assignments; Textbook readings assigned.

16                                2          3          4          5          6          7          8

 

Week 17: Review of Individual MyCompLab assignments; In-class writing on finding and reading research sources.

17                                9          10        11        12        13        14        15

 

Important dates to remember:

Monday, September 3, 2012 - No class: Labor Day observed

November 12, 2012 - No class: College closed in observance of Veterans' Day.

September 16, 2012 – Last day to withdraw from 16-week courses and have course dropped from record.

October 14, 2012 – Last day to withdraw with a "W" from 16-week courses; Students will receive a grade in all courses in which they are enrolled after October 14.

December 11 & 12, 2012 – Evaluation Days 

December 12, 2012 – Last day of student attendance

December 13, 2012 – Grading Day (Faculty on campus and available to students at designated times.)

December 14 – Grades due

 

VII.          Methods of Instruction

For each assignment, I will give you specific instructions regarding format, purpose, audience, in-class prewriting, draft revisions, and a due date schedule. In developing your essays and other writing assignments you must follow the instructions and meet the criteria detailed in the related assignment rubrics.

I will use lecture, discussion, in-class writing workshops, and small-group work to introduce and clarify course topics.  You will also participate in oral and written analyses of professional writing and student writing.  Instruction in searching for sources in online library resources and effectively using research results in writing is integrated into each essay assignment.  Each student will develop a plan to address errors in grammar and mechanics appropriate to the particular forms of writing taught in the course: e.g., thesis writing, incorporating sources, revision techniques to improve style, etc using MyCompLab.  Class meets in a computer lab so students can use word processing for in-class writing workshops and assignments.

 

VIII.    Course Requirements

Written assignments

You will write three formal essays and two in-class essay exams for this course.  Each essay must be typed and double-spaced in MLA format, with 10-12 pt. font and one-inch margins. Papers that do not conform to these guidelines will not be accepted. NOTE: I also will not accept papers that are not carefully proofread. 

The writing process involves reading and pre-writing homework assignments as well as peer or instructor consultations and revisions of drafts. If you would like to revise any of your essays after receiving your grade for an assignment, you will need to meet with me during office hours or make an appointment at our mutual convenience. Below is a brief description of the essay assignments for the course.  When I assign each essay, I will provide you with more detailed guidelines and grading rubrics.

 
Essay #1 is a 4-6 page investigative essay on the causes of an event or phenomenon chosen from a pre-approved list; your essay will be submitted with required pre-writing materials, an outline based on a model format, and an annotated bibliography (175 pts.).

 
Essay # 2 is a 5-7 page research essay in which you argue a position based on your analysis of supporting and opposing research on an issue chosen from a pre-approved list; your essay will be submitted with required pre-writing materials, an outline based on a model format, and an annotated bibliography (225 pts.).

 
Essay #3 is an 8-12 page research essay in which you present a proposal on a problem chosen from a pre-approved list; your essay will be submitted with required pre-writing materials, an outline based on a model format, and an annotated bibliography (300 pts).

 

Late Assignment Policies

I will not accept late homework assignments under any circumstances. Late essays will be dropped the point equivalent of one full letter grade for each class period after which they arrive; however, you may make arrangements with me to revise each essay assignment without any late grade penalty, so it is to your advantage to turn your essays in on time.  

If you miss a class, you are still responsible for turning in your work per my instructions for the assignment. If know that you will have difficulty completing an assignment within the scheduled time frame due to a prior obligation (e.g college team competition, theater performance, club event, etc.) and you wish to discuss an extension, you need to notify me at least 24 hours in advance.

 

Class Participation and Homework

Homework

You must complete all reading and writing assignments prior to the class meeting for which they have been assigned.  Expect to write a brief response to your assigned reading at the beginning of the class.  Homework is worth a total of 200 points.

Participation

Participation includes class and small group discussions as well as in-class writing.  This class meets in a computer lab because you will spend most of your time in class planning, drafting, writing, and editing your own essays.  In order to participate in all of these activities, you will need access to MyCompLab which accompanies your textbook.  You must bring your textbook to class.  Class participation is worth 100 points.


In-class essay exams

You will be writing two in-class essay exams (an analysis and an evaluation) that will count as 10% (100 points) of your final grade.

 

IX.       Instructional Materials Required:

Writing: A Guide for College and Beyond with NEW MyCompLab with eText, 3/E

Lester Faigley, University of Texas at Austin

ISBN-10: 0321845919

ISBN-13:  9780321845917

Publisher:  Longman

Copyright:  2012

Format:  Paper Package; 752 pp

Published:  04/30/2012

 

X.                Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

                  Grades will be based on: 

A.    Each essay assignment will include a grading rubric like the model rubric below to show how writing will be evaluated.  Grading rubrics will take into account both the effectiveness of the writing to a specific audience and purpose and the student’s grasp of the conventions of college writing.

B.     Students will be evaluated in terms of their response to other assignments, e.g. textbook readings, in-class writing, annotated bibliographies, essay outlines, drafts,  etc.

C.     Students will be allowed and expected to revise at least some of their writing in order to make it more effective.

D.    Students will also be graded on class participation.

 

Evaluation 

There are five major components to your grade:

3 Essays (Writing to investigate causes; writing to argue a position; writing to propose a solution to solve a problem)                                                                      60%     (600 pts)

Homework                                                                             20%     (200 pts)

Participation                                                                          10%     (100 pts)

2 in-class essay exams (Writing an analysis;

Writing an evaluation argument)                                            10%     (100 pts)

 

Grading Scale:           

A - 900-1000

            B - 800-899

            C - 700-799

            D - 600-699

 

Model Grading Rubric

 

“A” essays satisfy the following criteria:

 

A.        Focus: These essays have a clearly identifiable main idea, thesis, or claim.  The writer’s purposes are appropriate for the writing situation.  Promises made to the reader early in the essay are kept.  Expectations for the reader are set and then met.  Ideas, examples, and reasons developed in the body of the paper are clearly related to the main focus.   

 

B.        Development: These essays have ample supporting evidence:  sensory details, specific examples, statistics, quotations, or other data.  The writer’s assertions are immediately followed by supporting evidence.  The writer shows rather than just tells.  Appropriate research (personal experience, interviews, surveys, library sources) supports the writer’s man idea, thesis, or claim.  The writer shows how or why evidence is relevant to main idea or claim.

 

C.        Organization: The ideas and paragraphs proceed in some logical and apparent sequence or pattern.  The writer uses sufficient audience cues to let the reader know what has been discussed, what is being discussed, or what will be discussed.  Structural devices: attention-getting titles and leads, essay maps, summary and forecasting statements, topic sentences, transition words and phrases, and effective conclusions guide the reader from beginning to end.

 

D.        Style: these papers have appropriate voice and tone as well as effective sentences and word choice.  The style is appropriate for the purpose and audience.  In addition, these papers avoid problems in usage, grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and spelling that interfere with the writer’s ideas or distract from the audience’s pleasure in reading.

 

“B” essays have weaknesses in one of the 4 areas:

 

A.        Focus: These essays have a clearly identifiable main idea, thesis, or  claim.  Promises made to the reader are fulfilled.  Deficiencies in focus may exist, but the overall purpose is still clear.

 

B.        Development: These essays have good supporting evidence.  Typically, support may be thin or deficient in spots, but relevant evidence supports assertions or general statements.

 

C.        Organization: The ideas and paragraphs proceed in some logical and apparent sequence or pattern.  Occasional deficiencies in audience cues may exist, but the overall shape is clear to the reader.

 

D.        Style: Typically, these papers communicate clearly, but the voice may not be as clear, or a few deficiencies in sentence structure, word choice, grammar, or punctuation exist.

 

“C” essays have weaknesses in two of the 4 areas:

 

A.        Focus: These essays have a clearly identifiable main idea, thesis, or claim.  Often, though, these essays shift the focus at some point in the essay.

 

B.        Development: typically, these essays do have some supporting evidence, but some evidence is not relevant or some assertions or general statements are left unsupported.

 

C.        Organization: Often, an overall pattern or sequence may exist, but the writer has made little effort to guide the reader through the major ideas.

 

D.        Style: Sometimes these papers have a lackluster “Engfish” style, appearing to be written mechanically to fulfill an assignment rather than directed to a specific audience.  Distracting sentence errors may interfere with communication.

 

“D” essays have weaknesses in three of the four criteria or have one major flaw that seriously disrupts communications:

 

“F” essays have few redeeming qualities.  Typically, they are little more than rough drafts that do not meet the requirements of the writing situation, or they have major flaws that prevent communication.  Plagiarism will result in an "F" grade for the assignment.

 

X.        Other Course Information

A.  Attendance

Your overall success in the course depends on your presence in class.  You will be completing a substantial portion of your writing assignments in class, including frequent consultations with other students and me as you progress through the writing process.

 

B.  Lateness and Other Course Policies

If you are late to class, leave class early, or miss class, you will lower your final participation grade (0 points for each incidence).  The exception to this policy is submission of a "get out of class free" excused absence card; each student gets two cards for the semester.  You may use a card on any day except the two days on which there are in-class essay exams.  If you decide to use an excused absence card, you need to notify me at least 24 hours in advance to arrange for an extension on any assignment due the day on which you will absent.  There are no additional excused absences.

 

C.  Extra Credit Policy

An instructor is under no obligation to offer any extra‑credit work in any class. Extra credit will be made available only to students with excellent attendance and class participation. 

 

D.    If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact the ASSIST office in the Learning Center.  All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

 

Office Hours: Please feel free to stop by the Adjunct Faculty office on the second floor during office hours to talk about any questions that you have, difficulties that you’re experiencing, or anything else related to your work in this class or being a student at Oakton.

 

Instructional Support Services: If you would like assistance with your writing outside of class, you may work with professional or peer tutors at The Learning Center, Room 2400 in Des Plaines or Room A135 at the Ray Hartstein Campus. Individual appointments and drop-in tutoring are available at both sites. 

 

Assistance for Students with Disabilities: If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact the ASSIST office in Instructional Support Services.  All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

 

Statement on Tolerance, Non-Discrimination and Respect

Oakton Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, disability, age, sex, sexual orientation, or marital status in admission to and participation in its educational programs, College activities and services, or employment practices. The College does not tolerate sexual harassment or sexual assault by or of its students or employees. In keeping with this policy of tolerance and non-discrimination, and to create space for respectful, civil discussion, in this class all of us should strive to do the following:

 a) Listen and give careful consideration to all ideas expressed in class, especially those that are different from our own, without attacking or demeaning the people who have these views; this means attending to the discussion or in-class writing project, and not conversing with other students when either the professor or another student is talking;

b) Avoid using insulting terms or telling offensive jokes when talking to or about individuals or groups;           

c) Turn off your cell-phone before you come to class, and do not call or text people while class is in session;

d) Do not come to class late, leave during the middle, or wander in and out —particularly when someone else is saying something, as this is distracting, as well as rude. Of course, you may leave to use the restroom (Please, don’t ask!), but it makes more sense and is far more respectful to take care of personal business before class begins or after it ends.       

           

 

 

  

 

One "Get Out of Class Free" Absence Card

EGL102 Prof. Weaver

Fall 2012

 

You may use this card to take the place of one missed class period. 

 

You may use this card on any day except the two days on which there are in-class essay exams. 

 

If you decide to use this card, you need to notify Prof. Weaver at least 24 hours in advance to arrange for an extension on any assignment due the day on which you will absent. 

 

Name: _____________________________

 

Date of Missed Class: _________________

 

 

 

One "Get Out of Class Free" Absence Card

EGL102 Prof. Weaver

Fall 2012

 

You may use this card to take the place of one missed class period. 

 

You may use this card on any day except the two days on which there are in-class essay exams. 

 

If you decide to use this card, you need to notify Prof. Weaver at least 24 hours in advance to arrange for an extension on any assignment due the day on which you will absent. 

 

Name: _____________________________

 

Date of Missed Class: _________________

 

 

 

Online Course Resources


Writer's Toolkit

Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL) site map for specific writing skills & tasks

The Writing Center UWM

Oakton Library "8 Steps to Research"

Oakton Library Help for Students At the Reference Desk, By Phone, and By Email

Resources (used with permission of Gerardo Herrera, Oakton Community College English Department)

Grammar

ESL

Research