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Painting I

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ART 132

       Course Name: Painting I

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 6 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

ART 105 Fundamentals of Two Dimensional Art or ART 131: Drawing I

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course provides basic understanding of painting materials. Content includes watercolors, oils/acrylics, development of line, shape, spatial characteristics and color in terms of concept of work. Studio work outside of regular class time required.

IV.   Learning Objectives

A.    Student will comprehend and recognize art historical painting media uses to include:
         1.    Oil
         2.    Acrylic
         3.    Watercolor
         4.    Egg tempera
         5.    Fresco (buom and secco)
         6.    Encaustic
B.    Student will paint and produce original art works that indicate an understanding of:
         1.    Color mixing (limited palette)
         2.    Enlargement via grid
         3.    Under painting
         4.    “Alla prima” approach
         5.    Brush selection and use
         6.    Glazing and scumbling
         7.    Painterly approaches
C.    Student will perform basic gross motor skills related to painting i.e., stretching canvas, framing, matting and mounting
D.    Student will explore painting techniques as related to canvas, panel, and paper
E.    Student will evaluate and discuss through class critique his/her own, as well as others’ art work
F.    Student will demonstrate verbal articulation using art vocabulary.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    Introduction to Basic Painting Systems

        1.    Pigment and vehicles /examples and illustrations
            a.  oil
            b.  acrylic
            c.  watercolor
            d.  gouache
            e.  encaustic
            f.  latex
            g.  tempera, egg tempera
            h.  magna
            i.  casein
           
        2.    Introduction of Major Media
            a.  oil   advantages/disadvantages
            b.  acrylic   advantages/disadvantages
            c.  water color   advantages/disadvantages
            d.  gouache   advantages/disadvantages

        3.    Introduction of Major Supports
            a.  rag paper
            b.  prepared Masonite panel
            c.  canvas

        4.    Brushes
            a.  functions
            b.  sizes
            c.  shape
            d.  types

B.    Color
        1.  color theory
        2.  color mixing (pigment)
            a.  brilliance/intensity
            b.  tone/value
            c.  hue
            c.  transparency
            d.  opacity.

C.    Paper:  as Support
        1.  Paper stretching techniques
        2.  Media (acrylic, water color) manipulation
            a.  washes
            b.  wet in wet   graduated color
            c.  wet over dry
            d.  dry brush
            e.  resist
            f.  sgraffito

D.    Canvas:  As Support
        1.  Stretchers   Assembly and Squaring
        2.  Raw Duck, Gesso/Primed
        3.  Stretching:  Procedure and Technique
        4.  Painting Approaches
            a.  under painting   (tonal)
            b.  under painting   (coloristic)
            c.  alla prima   (direct)
            d.  impasto
            e.  glazing
            f.  scumbling

E.    Subject Matter
        1.  Painting from Still-Life
        2.  Painting from Model
        3.  Painting from Self-Directed Internal Interpretation

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Methods of instruction include lectures, demonstrations, films and/or slides, specific problem solving, class and individual critiques, and practical art studio painting time.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

    A.    Studio work:  Paintings made during class.
    B.    Field work:  Paintings assigned as homework.
    C.    Oral response:  Participation in critiques.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Students are given a list of what materials and media are needed at the beginning of the semester.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

A.    Evaluation methods include class critiques of each major area of concentration, class critiques of individual paintings, and a final overview critique.  Also, individualized on going, day to day evaluation of student's progress in the art studio section.

B.    Attendance is mandated by instructor.

XI.   Other Course Information



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.