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The Exceptional Child

I.     Course Prefix/Number: ECE 180

       Course Name: The Exceptional Child

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

ECE 102 with a minimum grade of C or consent of instructor or department chair.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course provides an overview of exceptionalities in development.  Content includes federal and state laws, characteristics and etiologies of mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional disturbance; speech and language disorders, hearing and vision impairments, physical disabilities, and giftedness.  Field observations required.

IV.   Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the course, students who satisfactorily complete all work will be able to:

A.    Demonstrate knowledge of the causes & characteristics of the following categories of exceptionality: mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional disorders, speech & language disorders, hearing impairment, physical handicaps, and giftedness.

B.    Demonstrate knowledge of PL 94-142, school code – Articles 21-2a and ADA & other related current laws, policies and issues, (labeling, student placement & parental & teacher attitudes).

C.    Demonstrate an understanding of inclusion, early intervention, Individual Educational Plan, Individual Family Service Plan, and the effect on children, families and society.

D.    Utilize resources to support the exceptional populations.  These resources include libraries, journals, parent organizations, community agencies & educational/recreational facilities.

E.    Demonstrate an awareness of the needs of children who are not diagnosed or labeled as exceptional but in some area of development they do not function within a normal or typical range.

In addition to the objectives listed above, this course also meets the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and the Early Childhood Content Standards as put forth by the Illinois State Board of Education.

 
IPTS
STANDARD 1 – Content Knowledge
The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
1A.  understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to the discipline(s) in which certification is sought.
1E.  understands how a student’s disability affects processes of inquiry and influences patterns of learning.

STANDARD 2 – Human Development and Learning
The competent teacher understands how individuals grow, develop and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
2B.  understands that students’ physical, social, emotional, ethical, and cognitive development influences learning.
2C.  understands human development learning theory, neural science, and the range of individual variation within each domain.
2D.  understands that differences in approaches to learning and performance interact with development.
2F.  knows the impact of cognitive, emotional, physical, and sensory disabilities on learning and communication processes.

STANDARD 3 – Diversity
The competent teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher
3A.  understands the areas of exceptionality in learning as defined in the individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) AND THE State Board’s rules for Special Education (23 Ill. Adm. Code 226).
3C.  understands how students’ learning is influenced by individual experiences, talent and prior learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values.

STANDARD 5 – Learning Environment
The competent teacher uses an understanding of individuals and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
5F.  knows applicable statutes, rules and regulations, procedural safeguards, and ethical considerations regarding planning and implementing behavioral change programs for individuals with disabilities.

 
STANDARD 6 – Instructional Delivery
The competent teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
6E.  knows techniques for modifying instructional methods, materials, and the environment to facilitate learning for students with disabilities and/or diverse learning characteristics.

STANDARD 8 – Assessment
The competent teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
8F.  knows legal provisions, regulations, and guidelines regarding assessment (and inclusion in statewide assessments) of individuals with disabilities.
8G.  knows methods for monitoring progress of individuals with disabilities.

STANDARD 9 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
9A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
9B.  understands the benefits, barriers, and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.
9D.  understands the collaborative process.
9E.  understands collaborative skills which are necessary to carry out the collaborative process.
9F.  understands concerns of parents of individuals with disabilities and knows appropriate strategies to collaborate with parents in addressing these concerns.
9G.  understands roles of individuals with disabilities, parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel in planning individualized education programs for students with disabilities.

STANDARD 10 – Reflection and Professional Growth
The competent teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
10D.  understands teachers’ attitudes and behaviors that positively or negatively influence behavior of individuals with disabilities.

STANDARD 11 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve students’ learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators – The competent teacher:
11D.  understands legal issues in education.
11F.  is familiar with the rights of students with disabilities.
11G.  knows the roles and responsibilities of teachers, parents, students, and other professionals related to special education.
11H.  knows identification and referral procedures for students with disabilities.

ECCS

STANDARD 8 – Human Development and Learning
The competent early childhood teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher:
8A.  understands how children from birth through grade three develop physically, socially, emotionally, cognitively, linguistically, and aesthetically.
8C.  understands how brain development from birth through grade there is promoted through developmentally and culturally appropriate learning experiences.

STANDARD 9 – Diversity
The competent early childhood teacher understands how children and families differ in their perspectives and approaches to learn and creates opportunities for growth and learning that are developmentally and culturally appropriate and are adapted for children for birth through grade three.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
9A.  understands conditions that affect children’s development and learning, including risk factors, developmental variations, and developmental patterns of specific disabilities.
9B.  understands cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of familial, sociocultural, and political contexts for development and learning.

STANDARD 11 – Learning Environment
The competent early childhood teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior as well as of children’s developmental levels and needs to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
11B.  understands how to adapt strategies to meet the specific needs of all children from birth through grade three, including those with disabilities, developmental delays, or special abilities.
11E.  Understands the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions of children from birth through grade three.

 
STANDARD 12 – Instructional Delivery
The competent early childhood teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
12D.  understands the importance of utilizing knowledge and strategies from multiple disciplines and systems in instructional delivery and in the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) and Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) for children from birth through grade three.

STANDARD 13 – Communication
The competent early childhood teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
13B.  understands how cultural, gender, and socioeconomic differences can affect communication in the classroom.

STANDARD 14 – Assessment
The competent early childhood teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses t hem to support the continuous development of all children.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
14A.  understands assessment as a means of evaluating how children learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting national, state, and local standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development.
14B.  understands the purposes, characteristics and limitation of different kinds of assessments.

STANDARD 15 – Collaborative Relationships
The competent early childhood teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community service agencies, to support children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
15A.  understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.
15B.  understands the benefits, barriers and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.
15C.  understands the collaborative process and skills, which are necessary to carry out the process.

STANDARD 17 – Professional Conduct and Leadership
The competent early childhood teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve children’s learning and well-being.

Knowledge indicators:  The competent early childhood teacher
17D.  understands legal issues in education.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

A.    History of special education

B.    Issues in special education.  Labeling, least restrictive environment, public law 94-142

C.    I.E.P.S.  Role of special education teachers and parents, other professionals involved

D.    Mainstreaming

E.    Early Childhood Special Education – Diagnosis, Assessment, Curriculum

F.    Mental Retardation

G.    Gifted

H.    Visual impairment

I.    Hearing impairment

J.    Speech and language disorders

K.    Physically/orthopedically disabled

L.    Medical disorders

M.    Learning disabilities

N.    Behavior disorders

VII.  Methods of Instruction

This course will be conducted on a lecture/discussion basis.  The text will be augmented by readings, films, guest speakers, small group activities and observations.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

The instructor will provide each class with further information as to attendance, policies, and support services.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Varies by instructor.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Quizzes, mid-term and final exams.

XI.   Other Course Information

The instructor will provide each class with further information as to attendance, policies, and support services.

Plagiarism/Cheating policies are covered under point V in this syllabus.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.