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Technology in Education

I.     Course Prefix/Number: EDN 210

       Course Name: Technology in Education

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

Recommended: Keyboarding; basic skill in word processing; basic skill in utilizing the Internet and social media applications.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course provides hands-on experience in using technology for education majors, while considering historic interplay of education and new technologies. Content includes finding, analyzing, organizing, presenting and implementing information related to use of technology in education; analyzing role of technology in education in society; developing strategies to compensate for possible digital divide among students. Focus is on increasing technological fluency, and developing creative and meaningful integration of technology into teaching in today’s inclusive classrooms. Course is designed for future Education majors.

IV.   Learning Objectives

Courses within the Education Program contribute to the fulfillment of multiple professional teaching standards.  In most cases the courses at Oakton will introduce the skill/concept covered in the standard; however, some standards are fully met at this level.  Each course will have assignments linked to particular learning standards.  These assignments, or “artifacts,” serve as evidence that the student has either been introduced to or met the concept/skill described in the standard.  The artifacts will be saved in an electronic learning portfolio within each Education course so that at the time of transfer each student will have standards-based evidence of accomplishment in all Education courses completed prior to transfer to a College of Education.  

It is crucial that students understand the linkage of assignments in all Education courses to particular standards.  Assignments are not only a part of a certain course, but begin to build the body of knowledge each student will continue to develop during the remainder of her/his academic life and throughout her/his professional career.  Each student, while in an Education major program at a four-year college or university, will be asked to collect and look back over all artifacts created, create linkages among the artifacts, and reflect upon the learning that has occurred during the course of his/her entire sequence of Education classes.  Each student will develop a complete electronic learning portfolio that addresses all professional teaching standards prior to graduation with a Bachelors degree.  Even though graduation with a BA may seem many semesters away, Education students at Oakton must begin to plan and develop their electronic learning portfolios while completing Education courses offered at Oakton.

For a full listing of professional teaching standards met at Oakton and more detailed information on where this course fits into the entire Education program and individual portfolio development, go to the Education Program website: www.oakton.edu/educationprogram.

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards (IPTS - 2013)
Standard 2: Content Area & Pedagogical Knowledge
The competent teacher has in-depth understanding of content area knowledge that includes central concepts, methods of inquiry, structures of the disciplines, and content area literacy. The teacher creates meaningful learning experiences for each student based upon interactions among content area and pedagogical knowledge and evidence-based practice.
Standard 3: Planning for Differentiated Instruction
The competent teacher plans and designs instruction based on content area knowledge, diverse student characteristics, student performance data, curriculum goals, and the community context. The teacher plans for ongoing student growth and achievement.
Standard 5: Instructional Delivery
The competent teacher differentiates instruction by using a variety of strategies that support critical and creative thinking, problem-solving, and continuous growth and learning. This teacher understands that the classroom is a dynamic environment requiring ongoing modification of instruction to enhance learning for each student.
Standard 6: Reading, Writing & Oral Communication
The competent teacher has foundational knowledge of reading, writing, and oral communication within the content area and recognizes and addresses student reading, writing, and oral communication needs to facilitate the acquisition of content knowledge.
Standard 7: Assessment
The competent teacher understands and uses appropriate formative and summative assessments for determining student needs, monitoring student progress, measuring student growth, and evaluating student outcomes. The teacher makes decisions driven by data about curricular and instructional effectiveness and adjusts practices to meet the needs of each student.
Standard 8: Collaborative Relationships
The competent teacher builds and maintains collaborative relationships to foster cognitive, linguistic, physical, and social and emotional development. This teacher works as a team member with professional colleagues, students, parents or guardians, and community members.
Standard 9: Professionalism, Leadership, and Advocacy
The competent teacher is an ethical and reflective practitioner who exhibits professionalism; provides leadership in the learning community; and advocates for students, parents or guardians, and the profession.

There are three levels that indicate the level to which the standards / indicators identified are addressed:
Partially Introduced: Concepts are partially covered at a beginning level of knowledge and/or skill.
Introduced: Concepts are covered at a beginning level of knowledge and/or skill.
    Met: Concepts are covered at a proficient level of knowledge and/or skill.

Introduced
Knowledge Indicators:
The competent teacher
2F. Knows how to access the tools and knowledge related to latest findings (e.g. research, practice, methodologies) and technologies in the disciplines.
6E. Knows and models standard conventions of written and oral communication.
9G. Understands local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture.

Performance Indicators:
The competent teacher
2O. Designs learning experiences and utilizes assistive technology and digital tools to provide access to general curricular content to individuals with disabilities.
5O. Models and facilitates effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning.
6J. Selects, modifies, and uses a wide range of printed, visual, or auditory materials, and online resources appropriate to the content areas and the reading needs and levels of each student (including ELLs, and struggling and advanced readers).
    
Met
Knowledge Indicators:
The competent teacher
3E. Understands the appropriate use of technology, including assistive technology, to address student needs, as well as how to incorporate contemporary tools and resources to maximize student learning.

Performance Indicators:
The competent teacher
2L. Demonstrates fluency in technology systems, uses technology to support instruction and enhance student learning, and designs learning experiences to develop student skills in the application of technology appropriate to the disciplines.
7O. Effectively uses appropriate technologies to conduct assessments, monitor performance, and assess student progress.
8M. Uses digital tools and resources to promote collaborative interactions.
9M. Communicates relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents or guardians, and peers, using a variety of technology and digital-age media and formats.
9S. Model digital etiquette and responsible social actions in the use of digital technology.
9T. Models and teaches safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources.

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

Topics are not listed in chronological order; students should refer to the course calendar for the sequence of topics in a specific section. Individual instructors may add additional topics.

1.  History of Technology in Education
2.  Learning about Basic Computer Processes, Hardware, Software and Peripherals
3.  Graphics Tools
4.  Library Technology and Research Databases
5.  Word Processing Tools
6.  Multimedia Tools
7.  Internet Tools
8.  Blogs and Wikis
9.  Internet Applications in Education
10. Social Media, On-line Photos, Videos
11. Impact of Technology on Knowledge Creation, Access to Knowledge and Information, and Traditional Educational Models
12. Impact of Technology on Communication and Relationships
13. Internet Research and Assessing Quality of Information
14. Units and Lesson Plans on the Internet
15. Educational Software and Applications
16. Technology to Keep Grades, Organize Student Records, and Communicate with Parents
17. Technology to Meet the Needs of Special Needs Students
18. Legal and Ethical Issues
19. The Digital Divide
20. Professional Development and Networking on the Internet
21. Accessing State Regulations and State/National Legislation on the Internet
22. Classroom Website Development

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Individual instructors will use an array of methods, which will include hands-on computer lab experience, and may include lectures, demonstrations, student presentations, multi-media presentations, class discussions, and group work.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

This course may be taught as a face-to-face, hybrid or online course.

Students in all EDN 210 sections must:
•  Attend an Education Program orientation session during this course if they have not done so beforehand.
•  Attend class, participate in class discussions, and fully engage in group work and individual assignments given as part of the class session.
•  Purchase the required textbooks and bring the textbook to every class session.
•  Complete the assigned readings before coming to class.  
•  Complete work on time. Late work will not be accepted without consultation with the instructor.
•  Possess the ability to read and understand college-level text material.  
•  Submit written work that is free from typographical, spelling, and grammatical errors; typed, doubled-spaced, using 10 or 12 point normal fonts (Arial, Times New Roman), with 1-inch margins. When applicable, all citations should use APA format.
•  Possess the ability to use basic technology, such as Desire2Learn (the on-line course management system used for all EDN courses), e-mail, Internet search engines, library research databases and presentation software.  Students should regularly check the D2L course site, at least once before each class session.  Class announcements are made via D2L. Students should e-mail the instructor within the D2L class shell. Students need regular access to the Internet, which is available in the computer labs at both campuses.
• Help the instructor create and maintain a safe and healthy learning environment for all students in the class. All students and the instructor should be treated respect and consideration.  Bullying, discriminatory, disruptive and/or disrespectful behavior can result in removal from the class and possible suspension or dismissal from the college.

Instructors of specific EDN 210 sections may create additional requirements of students, related to things such as:
• Specific attendance policies
• Specific policies regarding use of technology in the classroom
• Specific classrooms rules
• Specific academic requirements

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

• Collins. Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology, Teachers College Press, 2009.
• Richardson. Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms, 3rd ed., Corwin Publications, 2010.
• Vie. (E)dentity, Fountainhead Press, 2011.
• Tapscott, Don Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing Your World, New York: McGraw Hill, 2008.
• On-line articles and readings

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Instructors of EDN 210 sections will create specific assignments based on the suggested assignments below. At least one assignment must be linked to each of the learning objectives of this course, which are based on the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards (IPTS) 2013. Assignments may apply to more than one IPTS. There may be some assignments or elements of the course that are specific to that section and do not align with one specific IPTS. Individual instructors must fill out the grid below and include brief descriptions of each assignment below the grid. Each assignment should also have a detailed assignment sheet and grading rubric that is available to students in addition to the syllabus.

IPTS

Assignment / Artifact (suggested)

2F

Bibliography of Internet resources, hypermedia presentation, group blog / wiki, evaluation / demonstration of social media usage in classroom, software purchase proposal, presentation on resources for ELLs, research paper / presentation on digital divide / gender inequities in technology / information literacy, electronic learning portfolio, quiz / exam

2L

Evaluation of education software / games / apps, hypermedia presentation, mock student grade book and reports, mock letter / e-mail to parents, informational document for students on the proper and safe uses of social media, informational document for students on e-mail / digital etiquette, creation of educational video, digital photo slideshow, group blog / wiki, evaluation / demonstration of social media usage in classroom, computer purchase comparison, software purchase proposal, review of acceptable use policies, electronic learning portfolio, quiz / exam

2O

Interview of teacher and/or educational technology professional, bibliography of Internet resources, creation of mock classroom website, D2L discussion board, analysis of school and classroom websites, evaluation of education software / games / apps, evaluation and presentation of adaptive technology, quiz / exam

3E

Creation of mock classroom website, D2L discussion board, chat room participation, analysis of school and classroom websites, evaluation of education software / games / apps, hypermedia presentation, evaluation and presentation of adaptive technology, creation of educational video, digital photo slideshow, group bog / wiki, evaluation / demonstration of social media usage in classroom, software purchase proposal, presentation on resources for ELLs, research paper / presentation on digital divide / gender inequities in technology / information literacy, quiz / exam

5O

Bibliography of Internet resources, D2L discussion board, group bog / wiki, research paper / presentation on information literacy, website quality and accuracy assessment tool, library research database search, quiz / exam

6E

D2L discussion board, chat room participation, mock letter / e-mail to parents, informational document for students on e-mail / digital etiquette, hypermedia presentation, quiz / exam

6J

Bibliography of Internet resources, creation of mock classroom website, analysis of school and classroom websites, evaluation of education software / games / apps, hypermedia presentation, evaluation and presentation of adaptive technology, software purchase proposal, presentation on resources for ELLs, research paper / presentation on digital divide / gender inequities in technology / information literacy, quiz / exam

7O

Interview of teacher and/or educational technology professional, D2L discussion board, evaluation of education software / games / apps, mock student database and Word merging assignment, mock student grade book and reports, mock letter / e-mail to parents, quiz / exam

8M

Creation of mock classroom website, D2L discussion board, chat room participation, analysis of school and classroom websites, evaluation of education software / games / apps, group bog / wiki, evaluation / demonstration of social media usage in classroom

9G

Interview of teacher and/or educational technology professional, bibliography of Internet resources, D2L discussion board, hypermedia presentation, informational document for students on the proper and safe uses of social media, informational document for students on e-mail / digital etiquette, review of acceptable use policies, research paper / presentation on digital divide / gender inequities in technology / information literacy, quiz / exam

9M

Creation of mock classroom website, mock student database and Word merging assignment, mock student grade book and reports, mock letter / e-mail to parents, informational document for students on the proper and safe uses of social media, informational document for students on e-mail / digital etiquette, creation of educational video, digital photo slideshow, group bog / wiki, evaluation / demonstration of social media usage in classroom

9S

Creation of mock classroom website, D2L discussion board, chat room participation, mock letter / e-mail to parents, informational document for students on e-mail / digital etiquette, creation of educational video, review of acceptable use policies, quiz / exam

9T

Creation of mock classroom website, hypermedia presentation, mock letter / e-mail to parents, informational document for students on the proper and safe uses of social media, digital photo slideshow, review of acceptable use policies, research paper / presentation on digital divide / gender inequities in technology / information literacy, proper use of APA citation style in assignments, quiz / exam

All sections of EDN 210 must include the following elements of evaluation:

A.  Education Orientation
Students must attend an Education Program orientation session during this course if they have not done so beforehand. Instructors may give points or extra credit for completion of this requirement.

B.  Teacher / Technology Professional Interviews
Students must interview at least one teacher and one educational technology professional (individual responsible for purchasing hardware/software, overseeing labs, and/or teacher training in a school or district). Instructors will provide specific guided questions for the interviews. Students must track the hours spent on the interviews on the official Oakton log sheet, as well as write a reflection based on the experiences.

C.  Mock Classroom Website
Students must create a mock classroom website. Instructors will provide specific guidelines for the website content, which must include a homepage, a page geared to students, a page geared to parents, an instructional help page, and one additional page. All pages should be properly linked together and have clear navigational hyperlinks. Pages should include images and informational hyperlinks.

D.  Learning Portfolio
Students must organize all their completed work for this course in an electronic portfolio. The portfolio should include the assignments / “artifacts,” a document that clearly links each artifact with one or more IPTSs, and a reflection by the student on the linkages among artifacts and the extent of their learning in the course.

E.  Examinations
Student learning must be assessed by at least two examinations or multiple quizzes. At least fifty percent of the assessments should be in class or in a proctored testing center and be closed book, closed notes.

F.  Evaluation Scheme
Individual instructors must include a detailed breakdown of the possible points awarded for each assignment, as well as a tally of the total number of points available in the course.

G.  Final Grade

90% - 100%   = A
80% - 90%     = B
70% - 80%     = C
60% - 70%     = D
Below 60%      = F

XI.   Other Course Information

A. If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

B. Instructor Contact Information
Instructors will provide their contact information and office hours.

C. This course transfers as an Education major requirement to some 4-year colleges and universities; however, in order to transfer, students must attain a “C” or better in the course. For more information about the transferability of this and other Oakton Education courses, see the Education Program website (www.oakton.edu/educationprogram).

D. Important dates
Instructors will insert the current college calendar of important dates.



If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.