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Students with Disabilities in School

I.     Course Prefix/Number: EDN 280

       Course Name: Students with Disabilities in School

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 0 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

PSY 201 or concurrent enrollment in PSY 201.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Course surveys historical, philosophical and legal foundations of K-12 special education. Content includes overview of the characteristics of individuals with disabilities, programs that serve them under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and diversity of the populations of individuals with disabilities, as well as human diversity in general. Twenty hours in local, K-12 school settings are required.

IV.   Learning Objectives

Courses within the Education Program contribute to the fulfillment of multiple professional teaching standards.  In most cases the courses at Oakton will introduce the skill/concept covered in the standard; however, some standards are fully met at this level.  Each course will have assignments linked to particular learning standards.  These assignments, or “artifacts,” serve as evidence that the student has either been introduced to or met the concept/skill described in the standard.  The artifacts will be saved in an electronic learning portfolio within each Education course so that at the time of transfer each student will have standards-based evidence of accomplishment in all Education courses completed prior to transfer to a College of Education.  

It is crucial that students understand the linkage of assignments in all Education courses to particular standards.  Assignments are not only a part of a certain course, but begin to build the body of knowledge each student will continue to develop during the remainder of her/his academic life and throughout her/his professional career.  Each student, while in an Education major program at a four-year college or university, will be asked to collect and look back over all artifacts created, create linkages among the artifacts, and reflect upon the learning that has occurred during the course of his/her entire sequence of Education classes.  Each student will develop a complete electronic learning portfolio that addresses all professional teaching standards prior to graduation with a Bachelors degree.  Even though graduation with a BA may seem many semesters away, Education students at Oakton must begin to plan and develop their electronic learning portfolios while completing Education courses offered at Oakton.

For a full listing of professional teaching standards met at Oakton and more detailed information on where this course fits into the entire Education program and individual portfolio development, go to the Education Program website: www.oakton.edu/educationprogram.

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards (IPTS - 2013)
Standard 1: Teaching Diverse Students
The competent teacher understands the diverse characteristics and abilities of each student and how individuals develop and learn within the context of their social, economic, cultural, linguistic, and academic experiences. The teacher uses these experiences to create instructional opportunities that maximize student learning.
Standard 3: Planning for Differentiated Instruction
The competent teacher plans and designs instruction based on content area knowledge, diverse student characteristics, student performance data, curriculum goals, and the community context. The teacher plans for ongoing student growth and achievement.
Standard 4: Learning Environment
The competent teacher structures a safe and healthy learning environment that facilitates cultural and linguistic responsiveness, emotional well-being, self-efficacy, positive social interaction, mutual respect, active engagement, academic risk-taking, self-motivation, and personal goal-setting.
Standard 8: Collaborative Relationships
The competent teacher builds and maintains collaborative relationships to foster cognitive, linguistic, physical, and social and emotional development. This teacher works as a team member with professional colleagues, students, parents or guardians, and community members.
Standard 9: Professionalism, Leadership, and Advocacy
The competent teacher is an ethical and reflective practitioner who exhibits professionalism; provides leadership in the learning community; and advocates for students, parents or guardians, and the profession.

There are three levels that indicate the level to which the standards / indicators identified are addressed:
Partially Introduced: Concepts are partially covered at a beginning level of knowledge and/or skill.
Introduced: Concepts are covered at a beginning level of knowledge and/or skill.
    Met: Concepts are covered at a proficient level of knowledge and/or skill.

Partially Introduced
Knowledge Indicators:
The competent teacher
1A. Understands the spectrum of student diversity (e.g. race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, special education, gifted, English language learners (ELL), sexual orientation, gender, gender identity) and the assets that each student brings to learning across the curriculum.
1E. Understands the impact of linguistic and cultural diversity on learning and communication.
4F. Understands laws, rules, and ethical considerations regarding behavior intervention planning and behavior management (e.g. bullying, crisis intervention, physical restraint).

Introduced
Knowledge Indicators:
The competent teacher
1C. Understands how teaching and student learning are influenced by development (physical, social and emotional, cognitive, linguistic), past experiences, talents, prior knowledge, economic circumstances and diversity within the community.
1F. Understands his or her personal perspectives and biases and their effects on one’s teaching.
1K. Facilitates a learning community in which individual differences are respected.
3D. Understands when and how to adjust plans based on outcome data, as well as student needs, goals, and responses.
3E. Understands the appropriate use of technology, including assistive technology, to address student needs, as well as how to incorporate contemporary tools and resources to maximize student learning.
3F. Understands how to co-plan with other classroom teachers, parents or guardians, paraprofessionals, school specialists, and community representatives to design learning experiences.
8H. Understands concerns of families of students with disabilities and knows appropriate strategies to collaborate with students and their families in addressing these concerns.
9B. Knows laws and rules (e.g. mandatory reporting, sexual misconduct, corporal punishment) as a foundation for the fair and just treatment of all students and their families in the classroom and school.
9D. Identifies paths for continuous professional growth and improvement, including the design of a professional growth plan.

Performance Indicators:
The competent teacher
4L. Analyses the classroom environment and makes decisions to enhance cultural and linguistic responsiveness, mutual respect, positive social relationships, student motivation, and classroom engagement.
8S. Participates in the design and implementation of individualized instruction for students with special needs (i.e. IEPs, IFSP, transition plans, Section 504 plans), ELLs, and students who are gifted.
9I. Models professional behavior that reflects honesty, integrity, personal responsibility, confidentiality, altruism and respect.
9K. Reflects on professional practice and resulting outcomes; engages in self-assessment; and adjusts practices to improve student performance, school goals, and professional growth.
9O. Participates in professional development, professional organizations, and learning communities, and engages in peer coaching and mentoring activities to enhance personal growth and development.
9R. Is aware of and complies with the mandatory reporter provisions of Section 4 of the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act (325 ILSC 5/4).

Met
Knowledge Indicators:
The competent teacher
1D. Understands the impact of cognitive, emotional, physical, and sensory disabilities on learning and communication pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (also referred to as “IDEA”) (20 USC 1400 et seq.), its implementing regulations (34 CFR 300; 2006), Article 14 of the School Code (105 ILCS 5/Art. 14) and 23 Ill. Adm. Code 226 (Special Education).

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

Topics are not listed in chronological order; students should refer to the course calendar for the sequence of topics in a specific section. Individual instructors may add additional topics.

1.  Overview of Special Education
2.  Ensuring Progress in the General Curriculum: Universal Design for Learning and Inclusion
3.  Multicultural, Bilingual, and Diverse Schools
4.  Families and Their Partnerships with Professionals
5.  Combating Bullying and Discrimination
6.  Special Education Ethics
7.  Special Education Law and Policies
8.  Special Education and Technology
9.  Students with Learning Disabilities
10. Students with Communication Disorders
11. Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders
12. Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
13. Students with Intellectual Disabilities
14. Students with Severe and Multiple Disabilities
15. Students with Autism
16. Students with Physical Disabilities and Other Health Impairments
17. Students with Traumatic Brain Injury
18. Students with Hearing Loss
19. Students with Visual Impairments
20. Students Who Are Gifted and Talented

VII.  Methods of Instruction

Individual instructors will use an array of methods, which could include lectures, demonstrations, guest speakers, small group or full class discussions, student presentations, student debates, multi-media presentations, and/or field trips.
Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

This course may be taught as a face-to-face, hybrid or online course.

Students in all EDN 280 sections must:
• Attend an Education Program orientation session during this course if they have not done so beforehand.
• Complete 20 hours of in-school experiences and observation for this course. Students cannot pass this course without completing the required hours, most, if not all, of which will take place during normal school hours.
• Submit a criminal background check in order to begin the observation hours. Students will be provided detailed instructions for the background check by the Education Program Coordinator. There will be a fee associated with the background check.
• Submit results from a tuberculosis (TB) skin test (also known as the tuberculin or PPD test) in order to begin the observation hours. TB tests are given at the Oakton nurse’s office on either campus. A small fee is associated with the test.
• Attend class, participate in class discussions, and fully engage in group work and individual assignments given as part of the class session.
• Purchase the required textbooks and bring the textbook to every class session.
• Complete the assigned readings before coming to class.  
• Complete work on time. Late work will not be accepted without consultation with the instructor.
• Possess the ability to read and understand college-level text material.  
• Write at least the equivalent of 12-15 typed pages of material that will be graded.  This writing may take many forms. Writing should be free from typographical, spelling, and grammatical errors; and be typed, doubled-spaced, using 10 or 12 point normal fonts (Arial, Times New Roman), with 1-inch margins. When applicable, all citations should use APA format.
• Possess the ability to use basic technology, such as Desire2Learn (the on-line course management system used for all EDN courses), e-mail, Internet search engines, library research databases and presentation software.  Students should regularly check the D2L course site, at least once before each class session.  Class announcements are made via D2L. Students should e-mail the instructor within the D2L class shell. Students need regular access to the Internet, which is available in the computer labs at both campuses. Students should schedule a technology instruction session with the instructor during office hours if extra technological help is needed.
• Help the instructor create and maintain a safe and healthy learning environment for all students in the class. All students and the instructor should be treated respect and consideration.  Bullying, discriminatory, disruptive and/or disrespectful behavior can result in removal from the class and possible suspension or dismissal from the college.

Instructors of specific EDN 280 sections may create additional requirements of students, related to things such as:
• Specific attendance policies
• Specific policies regarding use of technology in the classroom
• Specific classrooms rules
• Specific academic requirements

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

•  Exceptional Lives: Special Education in Today's Schools, 7th ed., Ann Turnbull, et. al., Pearson, 2013.
•  Introduction to Contemporary Special Education: New Horizons, Deborah Deutsch Smith & Naomi Chowdhuri Tyler, 1st ed., Pearson, 2014.
•  Annual Editions: Educating Children with Exceptionalities 13/14, 22nd ed., Karen L. Freiberg, McGraw Hill; 2013.
•  Fighting for Taylor: A Mother and Child's Journey of Inclusion, Kimberly Moore, iUniverse, 2012.
•  Raising Jennica, Janet Johnson-Thonen, H. Habascrab Publishing, 2012.
•  The Short Bus: A Journey Beyond Normal, Jonathan Mooney, Holt Paperbacks, 2008.

•  On-line articles and readings

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

Instructors of EDN 280 sections will create specific assignments based on the suggested assignments below. At least one assignment must be linked to each of the learning objectives of this course, which are based on the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards (IPTS) 2013. Assignments may apply to more than one IPTS. There may be some assignments or elements of the course that are specific to that section and do not align with one specific IPTS. Individual instructors must fill out the grid below and include brief descriptions of each assignment below the grid. Each assignment should also have a detailed assignment sheet and grading rubric that is available to students in addition to the syllabus.

IPTS

Assignment / Artifact (suggested)

1A

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, research paper, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, current issue analysis, observation reflection, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, reflection on personal biases, pre post attitudinal survey.

1C

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, research paper, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, educational autobiography, quiz / exam.

1D

Assessment on IDEA, D2L discussions, class discussion / debate, research paper, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, guest panel of parents of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, current issue analysis, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, internet resource guide, presentation on adaptive technologies, annotated bibliography, quiz / exam.

1F

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal,  observation reflection, case study analysis, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, reflection on personal biases, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey.

1K

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, class presentation, current issue analysis, observation reflection, case study analysis, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

3D

D2L discussions, research paper, class presentation, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, presentation on adaptive technologies, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

3E

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, research paper, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, internet resource guide, presentation on adaptive technologies, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

3F

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, guest panel of parents of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

4F

Class discussion / debate, research paper, class presentation, current issue analysis, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

4L

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, internet resource guide, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

8H

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, research paper, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, guest panel of parents of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, current issue analysis, observation reflection, case study analysis, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, internet resource guide, presentation on adaptive technologies, annotated bibliography, educational autobiography, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

8S

D2L discussions, reflection paper / journal, class discussion / debate, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, guest panel of parents of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, observation reflection, case study analysis, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

9B

D2L discussions, class discussion / debate, research paper, guest panel of students with disabilities reflection, guest panel of parents of students with disabilities reflection, class presentation, current issue analysis, observation reflection, case study analysis, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, assessment on IDEA, quiz / exam.

9D

D2L discussions, electronic learning portfolio, reflection paper / journal, case study, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, internet resource guide, educational autobiography, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, portfolio progress report, instructor interview.

9I

D2L discussions, class discussion / debate, observation reflection, case study analysis, cultural diversity / gender / poverty and special education paper / presentation, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, instructor interview.

9K

D2L discussions, electronic learning portfolio, reflection paper / journal, case study, teacher interview, reflection on personal biases, internet resource guide, educational autobiography, personal philosophical statement on individuals with disabilities, pre post attitudinal survey, portfolio progress report, instructor interview.

9O

Attend professional conference or workshop, join professional organization, student club, electronic learning portfolio, reflection paper / journal, D2L discussion

9R

Current event analysis, compare / review school handbooks, teacher interview, observation reflection, exam / quiz

All sections of EDN 280 must include the following elements of evaluation:

A. Education Orientation
Students must attend an Education Program orientation session during this course if they have not done so beforehand. Instructors may give points or extra credit for completion of this requirement.

B. In-school Experiences and Observation
Students are required to complete 20 hours of in-school experiences and observation for this course. Students cannot pass this course without completing the required hours. Specific instructors will determine the tasks to be completed during the 20 hours. They must include 1) at least 8 hours of direct observation of children in a self-contained special education classroom; 2) at least 8 hours of direct observation of children in an inclusive general education classroom; and, 3) interviews with general education and special education teachers, and a school psychologist. Students must track the hours completed on the official Oakton observation log sheet, as well as write a reflection based on the experiences.
   
C. IDEA Assessment
Students must pass an assessment on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (70% or better).

D. Learning Portfolio
Students must organize all their completed work for this course in an electronic portfolio. The portfolio should include the assignments / “artifacts,” a document that clearly links each artifact with one or more IPTSs, and a reflection by the student on the linkages among artifacts and the extent of their learning in the course.

E. Examinations
Student learning must be assessed by at least two examinations or multiple quizzes. At least fifty percent of the assessments should be in class or in a proctored testing center and be closed book, closed notes.

F. Evaluation Scheme
Individual instructors must include a detailed breakdown of the possible points awarded for each assignment, as well as a tally of the total number of points available in the course.

G. Final Grade

90% - 100%   = A
80% - 90%     = B
70% - 80%     = C
60% - 70%     = D
Below 60%      = F

XI.   Other Course Information

A.  If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

B.  Instructor Contact Information
Instructors will provide their contact information and office hours.

C.  A proposed philosophy of social justice for working with individuals with special needs adapted from TASH will be presented in this course: “Teachers should use innovative educational strategies, cutting-edge research, and support grassroots, personal and collaborative advocacy for people with disabilities.”  (www.tash.org)  Described by many as pioneers of social change for persons with disabilities who have been underserved and undervalued in our society, the members of TASH are strong advocates of people who have traditionally been denied access to education, work, and community living.

D.  This course transfers as an Education major requirement to many 4-year colleges and universities; however, in order to transfer, students must attain a “C” or better in the course. For more information about the transferability of this and other Oakton Education courses, see the Education Program website (www.oakton.edu/educationprogram).

E.  Important dates
Instructors will insert the current college calendar of important dates.

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.