Primary Navigation
  • About
  • Academics
  • Continuing Education
  • Admission
  • Student Life
  • Student Services
  • Library
  • News and Events
  • Giving
Academic Writing for the Non-Native Speaker IV

I.     Course Prefix/Number: EGL 090

       Course Name: Academic Writing for the Non-Native Speaker IV

       Credits: 3 (3 lecture; 1 lab)

II.    Prerequisite

Placement test.

III.   Course (Catalog) Description

Advanced academic grammar and composition course for the non‑native speaker taking courses for college credit.  Introduces the student to advanced sentence structures and a variety of academic writing. Content includes organization, coherence, unity, argumentation, complex sentence structures, and advanced grammar.

IV.   Learning Objectives

At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

A.    Formulate and write a topic sentences and thesis statements
B.    Organize ideas into essays using logical paragraph structure
C.    Develop ideas to support a thesis statement
D.    Write coherent sentences, paragraphs, and essays
E.    Write unified paragraphs and essays
F.    Write a college-level argumentative essay
G.    Write a summary of an academic text
H.    Use language appropriate to the college essay
I.    Write a variety of sentence types with correct punctuation
J.    Use grammar correctly: verb tenses, subject-verb agreement, pronoun reference and agreement, and word order

V.    Academic Integrity

Students and employees at Oakton Community College are required to demonstrate academic integrity and follow Oakton's Code of Academic Conduct. This code prohibits:

• cheating,
• plagiarism (turning in work not written by you, or lacking proper citation),
• falsification and fabrication (lying or distorting the truth),
• helping others to cheat,
• unauthorized changes on official documents,
• pretending to be someone else or having someone else pretend to be you,
• making or accepting bribes, special favors, or threats, and
• any other behavior that violates academic integrity.

There are serious consequences to violations of the academic integrity policy. Oakton's policies and procedures provide students a fair hearing if a complaint is made against you. If you are found to have violated the policy, the minimum penalty is failure on the assignment and, a disciplinary record will be established and kept on file in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs for a period of 3 years.
Details of the Code of Academic Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook.

VI.   Sequence of Topics

Composition:

   A.    Essay structure, including thesis statements and paragraph organization
   B.    Development and support in the essay
   C.    Transition devices
   D.    Writing for different audiences and purposes
   E.    Writing in different rhetorical modes, such as narration, comparison, cause/effect, categorization, and argumentation.
   F.    Summarizing and responding to texts
   G.    Academic vocabulary development
   H.    Diction, especially collocations
    I.    Unity and Coherence
 
Grammar and Sentence Structure:

   A.    Coordination and subordination
   B.    Adjective and adverb clauses
   C.    Noun clauses, infinitive phrases, gerund phrases
   D.    Sentence combining techniques
   E.    Advanced verb constructions
   F.    Conditionals
   G.    Passive voice
   H.    Perfect tenses

VII.  Methods of Instruction

A.   3 hour lecture:  Lectures, discussion, small group work

B.   1 hour lab:  Open lab format in computer lab.  Students will work on composing, revising, and editing, with individual instruction given by instructor.  Grammar practice and grammar checking computer programs may be used.

Course may be taught as face-to-face, media-based, hybrid or online course.

VIII. Course Practices Required

In‑class exercises, homework, weekly writing assignments, testing, open lab work on composing, revising, and editing.

IX.   Instructional Materials

Note: Current textbook information for each course and section is available on Oakton's Schedule of Classes.

Check with the coordinator for current list.

X.    Methods of Evaluating Student Progress

A.    Writing assignments (in‑class and homework)
B.    Homework assignments
C.    Quizzes and Tests
D.    Lab assignments

XI.   Other Course Information

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact the ASSIST office in the Learning Center.  All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

   

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability you may be entitled to reasonable academic accommodations or services. To request accommodations or services, contact the Access and Disability Resource Center at the Des Plaines or Skokie campus. All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements. The College will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.