Home
     
     

Honors Courses Fall 2016

Honors Courses Fall 2016

All Honors Courses are IAI certified and will count as Gen. Ed. credits towards an AA or AS degree at Oakton, and will transfer to any college or university.

All classes are at DP in the Honors Classroom (2735) unless otherwise posted!

Fall 2016 Honors Courses

Des Plaines Core Seminars

31753

EGL

129

0H1

Honors: Introduction To Literature

MW

09:30 am-10:45 am

Tina Fakhrid-Dean

31754

HUM

124

0H1

Honors: African-American Culture and the Arts

MW

11:00 am-12:15 pm

Will Crawford

In this learning community, we will trace the history of violence against and within the African American community.  While there is a long history of white on black violence in this country that precedes and contextualizes the current violence we are witness to through the new media of cell phone and dash camera videos, we will explore the continuity that literary works and pop culture ranging from film, TV shows, advertising, and music add to the discussion of racial violence in America.  Examining texts ranging from slave narratives to current new Twitter hashtag movements, such as  “#blacklivesmatter”  and “#allwhiteoscars,” the course will analyze racial violence, exclusion, and the ways that black movements have theorized, debated, challenged, and overcome white supremacy and violence in the struggle for justice and freedom.

 

31755

PHL

106

0H1

Honors: Ethics

TR

09:30 am-10:45 am

Hollace E Graff

31756

SSC

201

0H1

Honors: Introduction to Global Studies

TR

11:00 am-12:15 pm

Richard A Stacewicz

Global migration has reached record levels over the past decade. Migrants are fleeing the Middle East, Central Asia, Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa (the Global South) and seeking entry into the Global North. These migration patterns have instigated debates in the West about the causes and impacts of these migration streams as well as solutions to the problems associated with this unprecedented flow of people. The purpose of the seminar is to explore the underlying political, economic and environmental causes for the mass migration taking place as well as to introduce students to the ethical debates about how to address this phenomenon and our responsibilities to one another as human beings.  The extent of this crisis is demonstrated both by the current events in Europe and also by the debates that have become both of the current U.S. Presidential campaign.

In order to address this contemporary crisis, we will begin by looking at the history of globalization and the work of philosophers who have supported and those who have condemned imperialism. This will be a lively seminar characterized by discussion.  Some of the directions we take at the end of the seminar will be determined by the interests of seminar participants.


Des Plaines Single and Co-Listed Sections

31851

EGL

101

0H1

Honors: Composition I

MW

12:30 pm-01:45 pm

Madhuri Deshmukh

 

31854

PHL

204

0H1

Honors: Environmental Ethics

TR

12:30 pm-01:45 pm

Thomas Bowen

The possibility of environmental catastrophe seems more likely every day. Our ability to respond appropriately or even understand the nature of the potential catastrophe requires a serious examination of multiple issues and concerns. Is there such a thing as “environmental ethics”? Can we have responsibilities and obligations to the non-human environment, or are we required only to be pragmatic in our addressing the various environmental issues we face today? What is the appropriate relationship between humans and nature? How do we establish, understand, and negotiate the animal-human divide? What attitudes towards nature are necessary or appropriate for a more ethical treatment or approach to the environment? How can we balance concerns for human welfare and liberty with concerns for the welfare of animals and the natural environment? Is there an ethical imperative to become vegetarian or vegan?

This course will explore these and other issues from the perspective of developing clear and well-reasoned approach to behaving and living differently in the world. Given this focus, this class will involve a few field trips and working with the local environment around Oakton—specifically the woods and the garden.

31924

PSC

202

0H2

Honors: International Relations

TR

09:30 am-10:45 am

George Lungu

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. Generalized conflict in the Middle East, terrorism, the rise of China and the other BRIC countries, the resurgence of Russia, and the decline of American influence, coupled with contradictory phenomena such as economic development and entrenched poverty, globalization and disintegration, as well as environmental issue, combine to give us a picture of an “interesting” international political environment. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the environment.

 

31922

HIS

225

0H1

Honors: History of the Islamic Middle East from the 7th Century to 1918

TR

11:00 am-12:15 pm

George Lungu

What explains the emergence of groups such as ISIL (ISIS, IS) and Al Qaeda? Why are large areas of the Middle East (Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen,) engulfed in conflict today? What are the roots of the conflict between Sunni and Shia Muslims? Why has the “Arab Spring” largely failed? How could a durable peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved? This course investigates the historical roots of events taking place in today’s Middle East and traces the development of this ever-changing region from the birth of Islam to World War I. It explores the major themes of Islamic Middle Eastern history such as the rapid rise of Islam, the Sunni-Shia divide, the evolution of the “gunpowder-empires,” the rise and impact of Islamism, nationalism, and colonialism, as well as the influence of modernity on the region. Students will learn about the development of political, religious, and economic institutions as well as social trends and cultural event that have shaped current regional and geopolitical realities.


Skokie Single and Co-Listed Sections

31923

PSC

202

0H1

Honors: International Relations

MW

09:30 am-10:45 am

George Lungu

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. Generalized conflict in the Middle East, terrorism, the rise of China and the other BRIC countries, the resurgence of Russia, and the decline of American influence, coupled with contradictory phenomena such as economic development and entrenched poverty, globalization and disintegration, as well as environmental issue, combine to give us a picture of an “interesting” international political environment. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the environment.

 

31921

HIS

226

0H1

Honors: History Of The Islamic Middle East In Modern Times

MW

11:00 am-12:15 pm

George Lungu

What explains the emergence of groups such as ISIL (ISIS, IS) and Al Qaeda? Why are large areas of the Middle East (Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen,) engulfed in conflict today? What are the roots of the conflict between Sunni and Shia Muslims? Why has the “Arab Spring” largely failed? How could a durable peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved? This course investigates the historical roots of events taking place in today’s Middle East and traces the development of this ever-changing region from the 19th century to contemporary times. Students will learn about the development of political, religious, and economic institutions as well as social trends and cultural events that have shaped current regional and geopolitical realities.


Des Plaines Research Seminar

31608

BIO

240

0H1

Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Research

M

11:00 am-01:45 pm

TBA

 

 

 

 

 

W

11:00 am-12:15 pm

TBA

30566

CHM

240

0H1

Honors: Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Research

M

11:00 am-01:45 pm

TBA

 

 

 

 

 

W

11:00 am-12:15 pm

TBA