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Honors Courses Fall 2015

Honors Courses Fall 2015

All Honors Courses are IAI certified and will count as Gen. Ed. credits towards an AA or AS degree at Oakton, and will transfer to any college or university.

Spring 2016 Honors Class Schedule

Honors Core Seminars at the Des Plaines Campus

Honors Core Seminars at the Des Plaines Campus. All classes are at DP in the Honors Classroom (2735) unless otherwise posted!

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

PHL 231 0H1: Honors Modern & Contemporary Philosophy (11917)

MW

9:30 – 10:45

Tom Bowen

HUM 121 0H1: Honors Western Culture & the Arts (11918)

MW

11:00 – 12:15

Holly Graff

Life in the 21st Century

At the start of the 21st century, humanity faces serious problems: environmental disasters; continuing war, poverty, and oppression; and, political and economic instability.  Are these problems an inevitable part of human life, or are they specific to our particular form of political and social organization? Can we work together to understand and address these problems as a community, society and species? How can we live meaningful and happy lives in contemporary society? Is happiness in your power or is it a question of fate and circumstance? Is a happy life equivalent to a wealthy life—or an affluent life? How important is religion and religious faith for a happy, meaningful life? This class explores these and related issues through the work of key philosophers, novelists, poets, artists, and musicians of the last two centuries (with a strong emphasis on the last few decades).

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

BIO 103 0H1: Honors Survey of Ecology (11919)

TR

9:30 – 10:45

Paul Gulezian

ANT 202 0H1: Honors Cultural Anthropology (11920)

TR

11:00 – 12:15

Lindsey Hewitt

 

In the summer of 2015, Professors Lindsey Hewitt and Paul Gulezian were part of a Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad Grant that took a group of professors to the indigenous communities of the Andes in Bolivia and Peru. The pair visited Quechua and Aymara communities in rural villages and large cities to learn about indigenous responses to globalization and the maintenance and evolution of their cultural traditions. As part of this immersive experience, they have developed a new tandem Honors Program core seminar that combines BIO 103 A Survey of Ecology and ANT 202 Cultural Anthropology. This new interdisciplinary tandem course will feature a set of recurring case studies from Andean indigenous communities to explore topics such as sustainable agriculture, gender roles and identity, water management, spirituality and religion, biodiversity, sustainability, and globalization. While the Andes will be an important focus for the course, many other cultures, ecosystems, and parts of the world will be explored with the aid of lenses from both environmental science and cultural anthropology.

 

 

Single/Co-Listed Honors Sections at the Des Plaines Campus

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

SPE 103 0H1: Honors Speech (11911)

MW

12:30 – 1:45

Kathleen Carot

 

Studies show that spoken communication skills are the top factor in determining professional and personal success. Through formal and informal solo and group projects, we will develop techniques for creating powerful oral presentations and improving interpersonal and small group communication skills.  As a Women’s and Gender Studies special section, our course will place special emphasis on current research on and theoretical approaches to the topic of gender and communication.  We will develop our capacity to think critically about how gender impacts all aspects of culture and society, including education, media and politics.  If you would like to refine your oral presentation abilities in a supportive yet challenging environment, then this is the course for you.  Honors Speech 103 satisfies a communications general education requirement, and counts at 3 LHEs towards both the Honors and WGS Concentrations.

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

EGL 102 0H1: Honors Composition II  (10641)

TR

12:30 – 1:45

Marian Staats

 

To what extent is gender natural or socially constructed, fluid or fixed? How do other aspects of identity like race, class, and age affect our performance of gender? What is the relationship between gender and sexuality? Gender and power? Gender and violence? How does embodiment inform our identities?  This class addresses these questions by examining current research in gender studies by writers who challenge traditional notions of gender and sex. Through reading and lively discussion, we’ll explore how scholars in gender studies enable us to question assumptions about gender identities while practicing new strategies for research writing. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate in the construction of the course by selecting some of the readings and films!

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

PHL 290 0H1: Human/Nature & Ethics (11271)

W

  2:00 – 4:45

Thomas Bowen

 

Human/Nature & Ethics

This Honors Seminar will explore how and whether an understanding of evolution by natural selection should inform our philosophical reflections on ethics and on ourselves as “ethical creatures.” Philosophers have often grounded their reflections on ethics in particular understandings of human nature and humanity’s relation to and role in Nature. As our conceptions of Nature and human nature have changed, so too, have our understandings of ethics—from the teleological theories of the Greeks to the sentimentalism of Hume and the (hyper-) rationalism of Kant. It is not an exaggeration to say that since the work of Darwin our understanding of human nature and nature in general has been dominated by the framework of evolution by natural selection. E. O. Wilson famously asserted, in 1975, that “scientists and humanists should consider together the possibility that the time has come for ethics to be removed from the hands of philosophers and biologicized.” This project was known as “sociobiology” and also goes by the name of “naturalizing” ethics. It is this project—of naturalizing ethics—that we will explore in this course.

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

PSC 202 0H1: International Relations (12076)

DP 2822

TR

9:30 – 10:45

George Lungu

 

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. Generalized conflict in the Middle East, the rise of China and the other BRIC countries, the resurgence of Russia, and the decline of American power and influence, coupled with contradictory phenomena such as economic development and entrenched poverty, globalization and disintegration, as well as environmental issue, combine to give us a picture of an “interesting” international political environment. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the environment.

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

EGL 115 HG2: Honors Introduction to Fiction (12105)

DP 2848

TR

11:00 – 12:15

Marian Staats

Introduction to Fiction - Humans and "Nature"

What can reading fiction tell us about our identities, desires, and experiences of “nature” and the environment? How do novels, short stories and films challenge our conceptions of the “natural” in gender and sexuality – as well as race, class and physical ability – that shape our communities today? And how have fiction writers contributed to our understanding of environmental issues confronting us today? In this survey of fiction and literary nonfiction, we will look at how diverse authors have challenged traditional definitions of the “natural” that structure our lives and explore how writers have questioned our relations with nonhuman animals and the environment to play vital roles in the shaping of our culture, revising notions of gender, sexuality, friendship, and family as they imagine possibilities for change.

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

HIS 226 0H1: Honors History of the Islamic Middle East from the 7th to 1918  (12075) DP 2822

TR

11:00 – 12:15

George Lungu

 

What explains the emergence of ISIL (ISIS, IS)? Why are large areas of the Middle East (Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen,) engulfed in conflict today? How could a durable peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved? Where is the “Arab Spring” now? This course investigates the historical roots of events taking place in today’s Middle East and traces the development of this ever-changing region from World War I to contemporary times. Students will learn more about the development of political, religious, and economic institutions as well as social trends and cultural event that have shaped current regional and geopolitical realities and conflicts.

 

COURSE (CRN)

Days

Times

Instructor

EGL 222 HG1: Honors American Literature II (12104) DP 2527

TR

  2:00 – 3:15

Madhuri Deshmukh

 

This course is a survey of important as well as once marginalized works of American Literature from the post-Civil War era to the present.  We will explore the ways that writers and poets responded to the social, historical and political events of their time, paying careful attention to the ways that race, gender and class shaped the American literary imagination.  We will follow the intellectual movements that gave rise to new literary forms and expressions, such as Romanticism, Naturalism, Realism, Modernism, and Postmodernism, as well as explore the ways that writers critiqued, challenged and ultimately reshaped what it means to be an American writer.

 

COURSE / CRN

Days

Times

Instructor

BIO 240 0H1 / 12068

CHM 240 0H1 / 12069 DP SHB432

T

R

10:00 – 11:15

10:00 – 12:45

Suzanne L Ziegenhorn

Melodie Graber

 

Developed by members of the science faculty, this Research Lab experience offers a hands-on approach to learning science while doing science. Team-taught by faculty from several disciplines, this is a challenging interdisciplinary course that follows guidelines for inquiry-based learning. Content includes active participation in a research experience that involves performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing results interacting with other students and professors in their research reading and critiquing research articles in the same research area and presenting at the end of the semester. Course can be repeated once for credit.

 

 Single/Co-Listed Honors Sections at the Skokie Campus

COURSE

Days

Times

Instructor

PSC 202 0H2: Honors International Relations (12077) RHC C114

MW

9:30 – 10:45

George Lungu

 

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. Generalized conflict in the Middle East, the rise of China and the other BRIC countries, the resurgence of Russia, and the decline of American power and influence, coupled with contradictory phenomena such as economic development and entrenched poverty, globalization and disintegration, as well as environmental issue, combine to give us a picture of an “interesting” international political environment. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the environment.

 

COURSE / CRN

Days

Times

Instructor

HIS 225 0H2: Honors History of the Islamic Middle east in Modern Times (12074) RHC C114

MW

11:00 – 12:15

George Lungu

 

What explains the emergence of ISIL (ISIS, IS)? Why are large areas of the Middle East (Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen,) engulfed in conflict today? How could a durable peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved? Where is the “Arab Spring” now? This course investigates the historical roots of events taking place in today’s Middle East and traces the development of this ever-changing region from the birth of Islam to World War I. It explores the major themes of Islamic Middle Eastern history such as the rapid rise of Islam, the Sunni-Shia divide, the evolution of the “gunpowder-empires,” the impact of Islamism, nationalism, and colonialism, as well as the influence of modernity on the region. Students will learn more about the development of political, religious, and economic institutions as well as social trends and cultural event that have shaped current regional and geopolitical realities and conflicts.

 

 

 

Academic Program

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IMPORTANT DATES


February 14
Last day to withdraw from 16-week courses and have course dropped from record*.

February 15
Presidents Day holiday, College closed.

February 16
Last day to change to audit for 16-week courses.

February 28
Incomplete (I) grades from fall 2015 semester for which faculty have not submitted final grades will become an "F" after this date.

March 11
Last day for filing Graduation Petitions.

March 14 -20
Spring Break

March 21
Classes resume after Spring Break.

March 23
Registration opens for summer 2016 semester.

March 27
Last day to withdraw with a "W" from 16-week courses; Students will receive a grade in all courses in which they are enrolled after March 29.

April 6
Registration opens for fall 2016 semester.


Full Academic Calendar