Honors Courses Spring 2017

Honors Courses Spring 2017

All Honors Courses are IAI certified and will count as Gen. Ed. credits towards an AA or AS degree at Oakton, and will transfer to any college or university.

Spring 2017 Honors Classes!

Core Seminars

Writing about Sustainability by the Numbers

Honors: Composition II & Honors: Elementary Statistics

(A must take for anyone who hasn't taken EGL 102 yet! Will be a great class! Don't miss it!)

EGL 102-0H1 CRN: 10593 & MAT 131-0H1 CRN: 11802

Professors Marian Staats & Jennifer Strehler

Des Plaines Campus 2735 TR 9:00 am – 12:15 pm

Did you know that:

  • Up to 40% of the food produced is wasted?
  • In 2015 13% of households (15.8 million households) were food insecure?
  • The US produces enough garbage every year to fill a whole the size of a football field (including the end-zones) that is 100 miles deep?
  • There are 327,577,529 cell phones in the US (slightly more than the population)?
  • 44% of Americans replace their cell phone every two years
  • Only about 14-17% of cell phones are recycled in the US each year.
  • If Americans recycled just 100 million cellphones, enough energy would be saved to power over 370,000 homes in the U.S. for an entire year. For every 42 recycled cellphones, enough energy is saved to power the average household for an entire year.

What do these statistics mean? How can we determine if they are right? What role should they play in our life choices? Public discourse today is filled with numbers—how many people own guns; the likelihood of winning the lottery; the Gross Domestic Product—so it is essential that we know what these numbers mean, the role they play in our public discourse, and how to assess and use them in our own research.

This Honors Core Seminar will provide students with the tools and knowledge to assess and use information in research projects focused specifically on questions of sustainability and climate change.

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Philosophical & Historical Dialogues between Islamic and European Civilizations

Honors: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy & Honors: History of the Islamic Middle East from the 7th Century to 1918

PHL 230-0H1 CRN: 11803 & HIS 225-0H1 CRN: 11804

Professors Thomas Bowen & George Lungu

Skokie Campus C114 MW 9:30-12:15

Did you know that some of the Islamic contributions to Western and world civilizations include: philosophy (commentaries on Aristotle), theology (Averroism), mathematics (Arabic numerals), chemistry (gunpowder), medicine (surgical technique), music (lute-playing, troubadour songs), literature (tales that show up in Italian works), manufacturing (glass, paper, woodblock printing), cuisine (pasta, sugar, coffee …alcohol,) and the enjoyment of everyday life?

Despite increasing references to, interest in, and fear of, Islam and Islamic culture in the U.S. and the Western world generally, there are still relatively few people in the West who appreciate the massive transfer of culture, science, and technology between Islamic civilization and Europe that began during the early medieval period and paved the way for Europe’s later intellectual development and scientific discoveries.

This learning community is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the complex interweaving of the history, culture, and philosophical traditions of the “West” and “Islam.”

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Des Plaines: Single Courses

Honors: United States History Since 1945

HIS 120-0H1 CRN 11930

Professor Richard Stacewicz

Des Plaines Campus 2735 TR: 12:30pm-1:45pm

During the second half of the 20th century and into the first decades of the 21st, the United States has undergone dramatic and seemingly contradictory changes. While there has been an expansion of civil rights and greater democratization, a backlash has arisen along various segments of the population to turn back the gains that have been achieved. Even though the United States' economy has expanded tremendously during the past 70 years, economic uncertainty plagues many Americans. The end of the Cold War was seen as an opportunity to promote greater global peace and prosperity yet the United States now seems to be enmeshed in a never-ending hot war in various parts of the globe. What has been happening to cause these seemingly contradictory outcomes? The purpose of the course is to explore these and other domestic and global historical developments and how they have contributed to our current economic, political, cultural and international realities.

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Honors: Topics in Philosophy: Philosophies of Identity and Intersectionality

PHL 290-0H1 CRN: 11137

Professor Kristin McCartney

Des Plaines Campus, 2735 W: 2:00pm-4:45pm

Intersectional theorists argue that systems of oppression are fundamentally interconnected and offer a philosophy of self-understanding and solidarity that asks us to address race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, religion, nationality, age, and other social categories as interconnected.   In this course, we will examine how any theory could foreground so many aspects of social identity, outline the structural and personal significance of social identity, trace the origins of intersectional theory in U.S.-based social movements, and imagine how our political and ethical commitments might shift if we applied intersectional frameworks.

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Honors: Effective Speech

SPE 103-0H1 CRN: 11547

Professor Kathleen Carot

Des Plaines Campus 2735 MW: 12:30pm-1:45pm

Studies show that oral communication skills are a crucial factor in determining professional and personal success. Through formal and informal solo and group projects, we will develop techniques for creating powerful oral presentations and improving interpersonal and small group communication skills.  Our course will also place special emphasis on current research into the ways communication is affected by gender, race, class, sexuality, and other intersectional identity categories. We will develop our capacity to think critically about how this impacts all aspects of culture and society, including education, media and politics. Participants will also be required to select presentation topics drawn from local, national or global issues of importance. (for example, the environment, gendered violence, globalization, institutional racism, LGBTQ+ rights, income inequality, etc.).  Course culminates with panel presentations given by class participants that address these or similar issues that will be open to the Honors community.  If you would like to refine your oral presentation abilities in a supportive yet challenging environment, then this is the course for you.  Honors Speech 103 satisfies a communications general education requirement, and counts as 3 LHEs towards both the Honors and WGS Concentrations.

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Honors: History of the Islamic Middle East in Modern Times

Professor George Lungu

HIS 226-0H1 CRN: 11947 (this class is co-listed with HIS 226-001)

Des Plaines Campus 2822 TR 11:00am-12:15pm

What explains the emergence of groups such as ISIL (ISIS, IS) and Al Qaeda? Why are large areas of the Middle East (Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen,) engulfed in conflict today? What are the roots of the conflict between Sunni and Shia Muslims? Why has the “Arab Spring” largely failed? How could a durable peace between Israelis and Palestinians be achieved? This course investigates the historical roots of events taking place in today’s Middle East and traces the development of this ever-changing region from the late 19th century to contemporary times. Students will learn about the development of political, religious, and economic institutions as well as social trends and cultural events that have shaped current regional and geopolitical realities.

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Honors: International Relations

Professor George Lungu

PSC 202-0H1 CRN: 11945 (this class is co-listed with PSC 202-001)

Des Plaines Campus 2822 TR: 9:30am-10:45am

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the global environment.

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Skokie: Single Courses

Honors: International Relations

Professor George Lungu

PSC 202-0H3 CRN: 11946 (this class is co-listed with PSC202 003)

Skokie Campus C114 F: 9:30am-12:15pm

“May you live in an interesting age!” is a reputedly Chinese proverb and curse that seems to capture the essence of the world today. This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of the complexities of international politics, and enable them to develop the ability to critically evaluate and interpret such contemporary international events and processes as war, intervention, poverty, economic competition and development, and the global environment.

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Des Plaines: Research Course

BIO

240-0H1

11656

SHC-DP 342

Honors: Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Research

M

 

W

12:30 pm-01:45 pm

12:30 pm-3:15 pm

TBA

 

CHM

240-0H1

11657

SHC-DP 342

Honors: Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Research

M

 

W

12:30 pm-01:45 pm

12:30 pm-3:15 pm

TBA